The Creative Circus Logo

 


Atlanta, Georgia


School Catalog - 2019-2020 Version 1.0
Effective September 4, 2019

 

School Name

The Creative Circus
 

School Address

812 Lambert Dr. N.E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30324
 

General Disclaimer

This catalog is an official publication of The Creative Circus and is subject to revision at any time.  The school reserves the right to change, withdraw, or supplement this catalog as it deems necessary or appropriate in its policies and operating procedures, curricula, class schedules, course content, training, equipment, tuition and fees, faculty, and staff. Students are individually responsible for being aware of information contained in the catalog and any amendments thereto.  Failure to read and comply with school regulations will not exempt students from penalties that they may incur.  Students are advised to read and fully understand the rules, regulations, and policies stated herein and to retain this catalog for use as a reference.   Students are encouraged to visit the student portal for updates to this catalog.
 

Accreditation Statements

The Creative Circus has been accredited by The Council on Occupational Education (COE) since 1996. As applied by the commission, COE has a self-regulatory process by which the commission recognizes educational institutions that have been found to meet or exceed stated standards applicable to occupational education institutions and/or programs (quality-assessment). The Creative Circus is authorized under federal law to enroll non-immigrant alien (M-1) students.
 

State Approval/Licensure

The Creative Circus is authorized by the Georgia Nonpublic Postsecondary Education Commission (NPEC). The NPEC authorization is renewed each year and is based on an evaluation of standards concerning quality of education, ethical business practices, health and safety, and fiscal responsibility. The school offers certificate programs. It is eligible to provide training services under the Comprehensive Vocational Rehabilitation Act, and is approved for the training of eligible persons.
 

Academic Calendar

Winter Quarter     2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Registration New Students 4-Jan 3-Jan 3-Jan 30-Dec 30-Dec
Classes Begin     8-Jan 7-Jan 6-Jan 4-Jan 3-Jan
End of Drop/Add Period 12-Jan 11-Jan 10-Jan 8-Jan 7-Jan
MLK Jr Day - School open  15-Jan 21-Jan 20-Jan 18-Jan 17-Jan
Registration-Current Students March 7-8 March 6-7 March 4-5 March 3-4 March 2-3
Panel Dates March 19-21 March 18-20 March 16-18 March 15-17 March 14-16
Graduation 23-Mar 22-Mar 20-Mar 19-Mar 18-Mar
Quarter Ends 23-Mar 22-Mar 20-Mar 19-Mar 18-Mar
Spring Break March 26-30 March 25-29 March 23-27 March 22 - 26 March 21-April 1
Good Friday Holiday (Admin office closed) NA NA NA NA  
Spring Quarter 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Registration New Students 29-Mar 28-Mar 26-Mar 25-Mar 31-Mar
Good Friday (closed) 30-Mar 19-Apr 10-Apr 2-Apr 15-Apr
Classes Begin 2-Apr 1-Apr 30-Mar 29-Mar 4-Apr
End of Drop/Add Period 6-Apr 5-Apr 3-Apr March 29-April 1 8-Apr
Memorial Day (Admin offices closed) 28-May 27-May 25-May 31-May 30-May
Registration-Current Students May 30 - 31 May 29 -30 May 27-28 May 26-May 27 June 1 - 2
Panel Dates June 11-13 June 10-12 June 8-10 June 7-9 June 13- 15
Graduation 15-Jun 14-Jun 12-Jun 11-Jun 17-Jun
Quarter Ends 15-Jun 14-Jun 12-Jun 11-Jun 17-Jun
Summer Break June 18 - July 6 June 17 - July 5 June 15 -July 3 June 14- July 2 June 20 - July 8
Independence Day Observed July 4th July 4th July 4th NA 4-Jul


 

Summer Quarter 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Registration New Students 28-Jun 27-Jun 25-Jun 30-Jun 7-Jul
Classes Begin 9-Jul 8-Jul 6-Jul 5-Jul 11-Jul
End of Drop/Add Period Labor Day 13-Jul 12-Jul 10-Jul 9-Jul 15-Jul
Labor Day 3-Sep 2-Sep 7-Sep 6-Sep 5-Sep
Registration-Current Students Sept 5-6 Sept 4-5 Sept 2-3 Sept 1-2 Sept 7-8
Panel Dates Sept 17-19 Sept 16 - 18 Sept 14-15 Sept 13- 15 Sept 19 - 21
Graduation 21-Sep 20-Sep 18-Sep 17-Sep 23-Sep
Quarter Ends 21-Sep 20-Sep 18-Sep 17-Sep 23-Sep
Fall Break Sept 24-28 Sept 23-27 Sept 21 - Oct 2 Sept 20- Oct 1 Sept 26- 30
Fall Quarter 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
Registration New Students 27-Sep 26-Sep 1-Oct 30-Sep 29-Sep
Classes Begin 1-Oct 30-Sep 5-Oct 4-Oct 3-Oct
End of Drop/Add Period 5-Oct 4-Oct 9-Oct 8-Oct 7-Oct
Thanksgiving Recess Nov 22 - 23 Nov 28-29 Nov 26-28 Nov 25-26 Nov 24-25
Registration-Current Students Nov 28-29 Dec 4-5 Dec 2-3 Dec 1-2 Nov 30 - Dec 1
Panel Dates Dec 10-12 Dec 9-11 Dec 14-16 Dec 13-15 Dec 12-14
Graduation 14-Dec 13-Dec 18-Dec 17-Dec 16-Dec
Quarter Ends 14-Dec 13-Dec 18-Dec 17-Dec 16-Dec
Winter Break Dec 17 - Jan 7 Dec 16 - Jan 3 Dec 21- Jan 1 Dec 20 - 31 Dec 19 - Jan 6
Christmas Holiday Observed Dec 24-25 Dec 24-25 Dec 24-25 Dec 24 -25 Dec 24-25
New Years Day Observed 1-Jan 1-Jan 1-Jan NA 2-Jan
 

About School

 

Mission Statement and Objectives

The mission of The Creative Circus is to graduate the best-prepared, most avidly sought-after creatives in the marketing communications industry.
 

History

Founded in 1995 in Atlanta, Georgia, The Creative Circus is an accredited, two-year portfolio-building educational program for the creative side of the marketing communications industry. The Creative Circus seeks to train and develop talent to fill industry need. In addition to advertisements, design pieces, websites and images, Circus students develop concepts for full-scale branding, brand extensions, product development, interactive design and innovative technology applications. At the end of the two-year program, Creative Circus graduates earn a certificate and are armed with experience and an exemplary portfolio that shows industry employers what they know and how they think. The Creative Circus is the first step to a career as a working creative.

 

Facilities

The Creative Circus is conveniently and centrally located at 812 Lambert Drive on a quiet cul de sac in Atlanta between its Midtown and Buckhead neighborhoods. Our building is a colorfully converted warehouse. Our four dedicated computer labs each have high definition projection systems. Our high-speed network is also wireless for access by student laptops and mobile devices. We have two high-capacity laser printers/scanners (color and black/white). Our large theater features built-in audio visual capability for the latest in multi-media presentation. Our photography studios include several small individual studios plus a large daylight studio and a large dark studio with a cyclorama wall in addition to our dark room for processing film. We are a dog friendly environment (with a doggie day care across the street). The school has an outdoor deck and picnic tables in front of the building. Parking is on our own property with some covered spaces available. There is a ventilated spray mount area, a student cafeteria with booths, refrigerator, microwaves and vending machines and ten restrooms. Concepting and lounging areas are located throughout the school. We have a small library stocked with industry publications. In addition to the two gallery exhibit areas, most of the wall space in the school is used to showcase student and graduate work.
 

Admissions Requirements & Procedures

The Creative Circus seeks students who have a strong desire for practical career preparation in their chosen fields and who have the ability to achieve academic success.  Applications for admission are accepted throughout the year.  Refer to the academic calendar for the exact starting dates.  Information about enrollment in The Creative Circus may be obtained from any of the school’s Admissions Representatives.

General Admissions Requirements
  1. Admissions Interview: Call or e-mail to arrange an appointment to visit the school. An admissions interview (preferably face-to-face, but by telephone if necessary) will provide full information about our programs, start dates, how we work with graduates and school requirements. Admissions interviews take place with an Admissions Representative who will evaluate a candidate’s interest in our programs and his or her dedication to the field of study. While work ethic and potential for success cannot be formally measured, these qualities are essential to success and will be discussed at the time of the admissions interview. Our goal is to enroll students who will be graduates and who will contribute to the creative industry. At the completion of the admissions interview, should both the prospective student and the Admissions Representative feel that the student has a significant chance of success from the course of study; the Admissions Representative will give the student a recommendation to apply and will work closely with the prospect to ensure all application materials are submitted in a timely manner. Prospective students who do not receive a recommendation from an Admissions Representative may appeal to the Director of Admissions.
  2. Application: An application may be obtained from an Admissions Representative. A $100 application fee is due at the time an application is submitted. Candidates for admission who submit an application without a previous successful interview will be contacted to schedule an interview.
  3. An Essay: 150 words addressing the following question are required: How will you participate and contribute to your own education in order to be a successful student and graduate of The Creative Circus?
  4. Enrollment Agreement: Indicates the tuition agreement with The Creative Circus and an estimate of total costs. This agreement allows a student to participate in our lock-in tuition policy to secure a tuition rate up to a year ahead and to maintain that rate as long as the student remains in good full-time academic standing. Should a student drop to part-time or withdraw, or be on academic dismissal, the former tuition rate is lost and the student will be charged at the most current cost per credit hour.
  5. All students are required to disclose to The Creative Circus any criminal convictions they receive while enrolled in any The Creative Circus program. Depending on the nature of that conviction, students may be dismissed from the program.
  6. 10-15 Samples of Work: All students must submit an application portfolio containing 10-15 samples of work. These samples need not be slick or polished and can take several forms. Their purpose is to indicate whether the applicant has the originality, creative potential and intellect to succeed in the rigorous Circus program. Prospective students with questions on what kind of work and how to submit work should contact Admissions. Applicants who would like their samples returned must enclose a self-addressed stamped envelope at the time they are submitted. Work is submitted to the appropriate Program Director for review and final recommendation on acceptance to The Creative Circus including any opportunity for advanced placement.
  7. Proof of high school completion or GED: All students must have successfully completed high school or have passed a high school equivalency (GED) test. Applicants must present evidence of graduation from a high school that is state-approved or accredited by an agency recognized by the United States Department of Education. A transcript from an accredited college will also be accepted as proof of high school completion.  For non-high school graduates, evidence of the GED equivalency or other certification from a state-authorized examination, such as the High School Equivalency Test (HiSET) or the Test Assessing Secondary Completion (TASC) must be submitted. Only applicants who show a passion for the field and innate talent, and whose background points to enthusiasm to learn, will be accepted. Each applicant must submit an Attestation Form indicating the high school from which he or she graduated or the GED testing center where the equivalency test was administered.
  8. Transcripts Official: Final transcripts from any previous post-secondary schools attended are required prior to starting at The Creative Circus. Transcripts can be mailed directly to The Creative Circus (attention Admissions) from the registrar’s office at a student’s former institution. Any fees associated with obtaining these records are the responsibility of the student.
  9. Notification: When all requirements for admissions have been fulfilled, the applicant will be notified regarding his or her admissions status. Any questions regarding acceptance should be directed to the applicant’s Admissions Representative.
The Creative Circus is authorized under U.S. Federal Law, Immigration & Nationality Act, Sec. 101(a), (5), (F) to enroll non-immigrant alien students from other countries. Students living abroad should submit certified proof of high school graduation (translated into English), college transcript, application fee in U.S. dollars and required immigration documentation. Copywriting students should submit most or all of their samples in English. All students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language. Circus Admissions Representatives can provide additional information regarding the M-1 Visa required.

Prior Education Requirement
Each applicant must have earned one of the following educational credentials from a The Creative Circus recognized organization: a high school diploma or equivalent or a General Educational Development (GED) certificate.

Prior to starting classes, applicants will be required to submit proof of high school graduation or a recognized equivalency certificate (GED) to the school by providing the school with an official transcript confirming graduation or official transcript showing earned postsecondary credit. A transcript from an accredited college will also be accepted as proof of high school graduation.

 

Equal Educational Opportunity

a. The Creative Circus declares and affirms a policy of equal employment opportunity, equal educational opportunity, and nondiscrimination in the provision of educational services to the public.  The school will make all decisions regarding recruitment, hiring, promotion, and all other terms and conditions of employment without discrimination on grounds of race, color, creed or religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, genetic information or other factors which cannot lawfully be the basis for an employment decision.

b. The Creative Circus reaffirms its policy of administering all of its educational programs and related supporting services and benefits in a manner which does not discriminate because of a student’s or prospective student’s race, color, creed or religion, sex, national origin, age, disability or other characteristics which cannot lawfully be the basis for provision of such services.

c. The Creative Circus adheres to the provisions of the following federal laws, in each case as they have been amended to date: (a) the Higher Education Act of 1965, (b) Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and (c) the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974.  Inquiries concerning the application of these laws and their implementing regulations may be referred to the Executive Director.
 

Student Disability Accommodation

This policy and procedure enables Ancora Education campuses to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, which requires reasonable accommodations made for qualified students with disabilities and prohibits Ancora Education from excluding such students from, or denying them the benefits of, its programs or activities.

It is the policy of Ancora Education to provide qualified students who have disabilities with reasonable accommodation based upon relevant law, the academic program’s educational standards, and sound ethical practice in disability services.

Having provided sufficient evidence of a disability and need for accommodation, a student may make official requests for accommodation by submitting an official disability accommodations request form and supporting materials. Students should make accommodation requests as far in advance of the relevant course, entrance assessment, activity or program, to allow for appropriate consideration and planning.  Because the reasonableness of any individual accommodation request can vary substantially depending upon a student's current course load, schedule, or course content, accommodation requests must be reviewed by the Director of Education each term of enrollment. When possible, students entering a program of study for the first time should submit information related to disability at least six weeks prior to enrollment so that reasonable accommodation can be arranged and delivered prior to the start of the term. The Director of Education will consider the information (documentation) provided by the student, consult with faculty and/or other campus officials as needed, and determine what constitutes reasonable accommodation(s) for the student’s disability.  

The Director of Education will identify a list of approved accommodations in accordance with the manifestations of the disability, a copy of which will be shared with the student.  For academic accommodations, following review and approval at the start of each term of enrollment, the Director of Education will prepare individual letters for each instructor summarizing the approved accommodations relevant to his/her course. These letters will be delivered to the student and appropriate instructors through email.  Faculty and other campus officials then are required to provide reasonable accommodation(s) in accordance with the Director of Education’s letter(s).  If a faculty member or other campus official does not agree to an accommodation request, the student should seek the assistance of the Director of Education

A student who disagrees in any way with a decision regarding a request for accommodation may seek review of a decision under this procedure by contacting the Executive Director. If the Executive Director feels that the disagreement can be resolved informally, the Executive Director will try to do so, working with the student and the Director of Education and any other necessary individuals (such as a faculty member, for example).  If informal resolution is ineffective or impractical, the Executive Director will refer the matter to the Office of the Chief Academic Officer for investigation and review.
 

Transfer of credit

Students who wish to transfer credits from another institution must submit transcripts from all postsecondary schools attended. An applicant may be granted transfer credit for courses taken at other schools that are determined to substantively address a consistent set of learning objectives compared with courses offered at Ancora Education campuses. Transfer of credit evaluations will be conducted using the following guidelines:
  • An official transcript of the student's coursework must be furnished directly by the institution where the coursework was completed before any application for transfer credits can be accepted.
  • The campus may request additional information such as course descriptions or syllabi if there is question on the comparability of program content to the program in which the student will enroll. The student is responsible for providing any requested additional information.
  • The student may be required to demonstrate through testing any hands-on competencies before transfer credit is accepted for courses where such competencies are required.
  • Credits must have been earned in courses offered at institutions accredited by an agency recognized by either the U.S. Department of Education or the Council for Higher Education Accreditation at the time the credit was earned.
  • A grade of "C" or higher must be earned in each course completed to be eligible for transfer from a non-Ancora owned school.
  • A grade of "D" or higher must be earned in each course completed to be eligible for transfer from a commonly owned Ancora Education school.
  • Credits will be evaluated on a course by course basis. In most instances, core requirements must be transferred within seven (7) year of completion. No timeframe restrictions will be imposed on general education coursework.
  • Courses taken at institutions operating on quarter systems will be evaluated as direct equivalent credits into quarter credit programs. Those transferred from institutions operating on a semester basis to quarter hour institutions are multiplied by one and one half to convert them to quarter credit hours.
  • In the case of a clock hour program, any course accepted must be at least the same number of clock hours as the course for which it is accepted. The student will also be required to demonstrate through testing any hands-on competencies prior to clock hour course credit being accepted for transfer.
  • Courses that are classified as foundational in nature are not transferable.
  • Transfer credits may impact the student’ schedule, causing the student to be less than full-time, which may impact eligibility for some sources of financial aid.
  • The student will not be charged any fees from the receiving institution for transferring in credits from other institutions. Students are responsible for all fees for obtaining official transcripts and supporting documentation for transfer of credit (Students receiving VA funding, see Proof of Previous Education).
  • In all cases of transfer of credit, Ancora campuses will attempt to avoid excessive loss of previously earned credit and avoid coursework duplication. Any questions about transfer of credits/clock hours should be discussed with the Director of Education, or designee.

Maximum Transfer Credits Accepted (Residency Requirement)
The total credits not earned in residency, including credit by transfer and credit by proficiency testing, may not exceed seventy five percent 75% of the total credit hours (or clock hours for non-credit hour programs) required for the completion of the program of study. 25% of the student’s total credit hours (or clock hours for non-credit hour programs) must be completed in residency.

Coursework Completed at Foreign Institutions
Credit earned at foreign institutions must be externally evaluated by a Ancora Education approved foreign credential evaluator which includes National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES) or Association of International Credential Evaluators (AICE) members.

Notice Concerning Transferability of Credits and Credentials Earned at Our Campus
Each Ancora Education campus is an accredited campus that is designed to provide the student with vocational career training and is not designed to prepare the student for transfer to other institutions. Acceptance of credits earned at a Ancora Education campus is determined solely by the receiving institution. The campus cannot and does not guarantee credit transfer.

Students wishing to transfer credits should first consult with the Registrar at those institutions concerning acceptance. Ancora Education campuses will provide official transcripts, for a fee, as well as course descriptions by request. Students with outstanding financial obligations will receive only unofficial transcripts, when requested. Accreditation alone does not guarantee credit transfer.

Transfer to Other Ancora Education Campuses
Students in good standing may transfer to another campus location. Transfer students are advised that they will be subject to the minimum residency requirements at the new campus for the program in which they are enrolled.

Procedure: Transfer of Credit
The student is responsible for requesting official transcripts be sent from the prior institution directly to Ancora Education campuses. 

  • All requests for transfer credit must be submitted by the end of the first term of attendance at the school.
  • Since transfer credits impact scheduling and on time completion for students, students who submit official transcripts after the drop/add period in the student’s first term may see changes to scheduling and on time completion.
  • If needed to evaluate comparability of credit, the student may need to request course descriptions and syllabi from the prior institution.
  • The Director of Education, or designee, will review credits based on the guidelines listed above.
  • The Director of Education, or designee, will fill out the Transcript Evaluation Form and notify the student of the credits accepted for transfer.
  • Students wishing to appeal decisions on transfer credit should submit request in writing to the Executive Director to identify reasons for appeal.
    • The Executive Director will request follow-up information as needed for the appeal. 
    • The Executive Director will submit appeal through the Office of the Chief Academic Officer.
    • The Executive Director will notify student of final decision regarding transfer credit. The decision from the Office of the Chief Academic Officer will be final.
    • Once transfer credit is accepted, the student’s tuition will be adjusted based on the number of credits successfully transferred in.
    A student who wants to transfer credits from another institution must submit transcripts from all post-secondary schools attended. An applicant may be granted transfer credit for courses taken at other schools that are parallel to courses offered at The Creative Circus. See Advanced Standing by Transfer Credit in this catalog.

    In all cases of transfer of credit, The Creative Circus will attempt to avoid excessive loss of previously earned credit and avoid course work duplication.

    Courses that are classified as foundational in nature are not transferable.
     

    Proficiency Testing

    Ancora Education campuses may offer the opportunity for students to demonstrate proficiency in a course’s content and receive course credit by examination. Both internal and external proficiency credit may be considered.

    Internal proficiency exams are available for certain courses to provide students with the opportunity to earn credit for course material in which they have previous experience. Students must apply to request a proficiency examination for a particular subject. Such a request should be granted if an examination is available and the Director of Education has reason to believe the student’s experience or training warrants such an evaluation. Students who were enrolled in the course beyond the Drop/Add period are not eligible to sit for the exam and a proficiency exam may only be attempted once. A score of 80% or higher is required to earn internal proficiency credit. Students will not be approved to test out of 300 or 400 level courses. Equivalent coursework from another institution may be evaluated for transfer credit per the transfer credit policy.

    External Proficiency credit may also be granted to students who achieve acceptable scores on specific nationally recognized examinations such as Advanced Placement (AP), CLEP, and DANTES. The Director of Education, or designee, will review examinations proposed for credit to determine whether the material covered in the examination matches coursework in the student’s program of study.

    Procedure: Internal Proficiency Examinations
    The student is responsible for requesting the Application for Proficiency Examination from the Office of the Registrar.

    • The student must request the Application for Proficiency Examination form from the Academic Department within the first five weeks of the student’s first term of enrollment.
    • The student will fill out the form, including information as to why the student is requesting a proficiency examination. The campus may deny an application for a student who does not have relevant coursework, certification, or prior work experience.
    • The Director of Education, or designee, will review the request, and if approved, will set up the proficiency examination.
      • Some examinations may be scheduled for a specific day and time.
      • Other examinations may be scheduled to be turned in by a specific day.
      • Some examinations may have a hands-on component that must be proctored.
    • Students wishing to appeal decisions on proficiency examinations should submit the request in writing to the Executive Director to identify reasons for appeal.
      • The Executive Director will request follow-up information as needed for the appeal.
      • The Executive Director will submit appeal through the Office of the Chief Academic Officer.
      • The Executive Director will notify student of final decision regarding proficiency credit. The decision from the Office of the Chief Academic Officer will be final.
    • Once a proficiency examination is passed, the student’s tuition will be adjusted based on the number of credits successfully passed.
     

    Proof of Previous Education for Veterans Affairs Funding

    As a student receiving any Veteran Affairs (VA) funding, it is required to show proof of all previous education obtained for Post-Secondary studies. When applying for VA Benefits, a student must complete a transcript request for all schools previously attended. The school will submit the request at no cost to the student applying, and the student will initially be certified for the first academic term. The school should receive the requested transcript(s) within the students first term to ensure accurate scheduling and timely certification of future charges. Each state has published limitations for how long a student may be certified without receipt and evaluation of prior coursework transcripts.  Students with transcript(s) not received within their State’s Limitation will no longer be certified for future coursework until the school has received the required transcript(s). Exceptions to these limitations must be approved by the State Approving Agency and Executive Director.

     

    Internet Policy

    Acceptable use Internet access, which connects thousands of computers and millions of subscribers, is available to students and staff. Internet access can promote educational excellence by facilitating resource sharing, innovation, and communications.

    Throughout the educational community, the Internet can be used to educate and inform staff and students. As a learning resource, the Internet is similar to books, magazines, audio recordings, videos, CD-ROMs, and other information media. Student and educators use the Internet to participate in distance learning activities, to ask questions, and consult with experts, to communicate with other students, educators, and individuals, and to locate materials to meet educational needs.

    The Internet also provides access to material that is of no educational value. However, the value of the information found and interaction available outweighs the possibility of locating inappropriate material.

    Internet access is coordinated through a complex association of government agencies, as well as regional and state networks. The smooth operation of the network relies upon the proper conduct of all users who must adhere to strict guidelines. The guidelines, which require efficient, ethical, and legal utilization of the network resources, are provided here so that users are aware of the responsibilities they are about to acquire. In addition, guidelines from other service providers may result in access being suspended and or future access being denied.

    Online Responsibilities

    a. Acceptable use
    The goal of providing Internet access for students and staff is to support education and research consistent with the educational objectives of the School. Transmission of any material in violation of any federal or state regulation is prohibited. This includes, but is not limited to, copyrighted material, threatening or obscene material, or material in violation of School Policies.

    b. Privileges

    The use of the Internet is a privilege, not a right, and inappropriate use will result in suspension of that privilege. The equipment, network, and data are the sole property of the School. Therefore, the School retains the right to monitor and or audit any network account at random to insure that the user is adhering to this policy.

    c. Network Etiquette

    While each user has the right to free speech, each user is expected to abide by the School’s accepted code of conduct. Appropriate behavior in telecommunications includes, but is not limited to: 
                i. Being polite 
                ii. Using appropriate conduct. Do not swear, use vulgarities, be abusive, post or publish objectionable material.
                iii. Not engaging in illegal activities. 
                iv. Not revealing personal addresses or phone numbers. 
                v. Recognizing that school electronic mail is not private. Messages relating to or in support of illegal activities or in violation of the acceptable use policy will be reported to appropriate authorities. 
                vi. Not knowingly or carelessly performing an act that will interfere with the normal operation of computers, peripherals, or networks. 
                vii. Respecting copyright laws. All communications and information access via the network are private property unless otherwise stated. 
                viii. Not employing the network for commercial purposes. 
                ix. Not transmitting material that infringes upon the right of others.

    d. Warranty

    The School makes no warranties of any kind, whether expressed or implied, for the service it is providing. The School will not be responsible for any damages suffered using the Internet. These include, but are not limited to, loss of data resulting from delays, nondeliveries, misdeliveries, service interruptions, or personal errors or omissions. Use of any information obtained via the Internet is at the user’s risk. The School specifically denies any responsibility for the accuracy or quality of information obtained through Internet access. 

    e. Vandalism
    Vandalism will result in suspension or cancellation of privileges. Vandalism is defined as any malicious attempt to harm or destroy the data of another user or to damage other networks. This includes but is not limited to the uploading or creation of computer viruses.

    Refer to the catalog’s Student Code of Conduct section for a list of possible disciplinary sanctions.

     

    Individual Subjects

    An application may be submitted for an individual subject by meeting with an Admissions Representative who will provide the class hours and the days or evenings on which the class meets as well as any prerequisites necessary for particular subjects. Tuition charges for such courses or programs are based on the total number of clock or credit hours scheduled.
     

    Tuition

    Prior to registration all students must meet with financial aid concerning tuition arrangements. The tuition rate and program fee rate in effect at the time of initial class start date will not change for the remainder of the program. Students who leave school for any reason and later return will re-enter at the then current tuition rate and program fee rate in accordance with the current catalog. This does not apply to school fees or to books and supplies.

    Program  Total Credits Total quarters Tuition per credit Tuition total Lab fee per quarter Lab fee total Application fee Total program charges (estimate)
    Art Direction 96.8 8 $465 $45,012 $125 $1,000 $100 $46,112
    Copywriting 96.8 8 $465 $45,012 $125 $1,000 $100 $46,112
    Graphic Design 96.8 8 $465 $45,012 $125 $1,000 $100 $46,112
    Image 96.8 8 $465 $45,012 $125 $1,000 $100 $46,112
    Interactive Development 96.8 8 $465 $45,012 $125 $1,000 $100 $46,112


    Students re-enrolling at The Creative Circus will be charged the same $100 application fee which applies to all enrolling students, but will not be charged for an additional re-entry fee.

    Other Fees  
    Returned Check Fee  $25 per item
     

    Student Discounts

    Employee Family Member Tuition Discount
    A full-time employee who has at least one year of service is eligible for a scholarship for his/her spouse or dependent child over the age of 18. Employees are not eligible for scholarships. The family member may apply for any program offered by an Ancora school by completing an Ancora Family Member Scholarship Application form (get it from the Executive Director or HR Department). Approval is based on class availability and must be approved by the school’s Executive Director and the COO. The family member may apply for student financial aid if eligible. If the employee terminates
    while the family member is attending, the student’s tuition will revert to full tuition for the remainder of the program.
     

    Payment Plans

    Tuition, fees, and book supply charges are due and payable at registration. Arrangements may be made for students to pay on a monthly basis the portion of their charges not met by financial aid, scholarships, grants, or other sources. All payment arrangements must be discussed with the Financial Services office prior to registration.

    Students expecting to use loan and grant funds must realize that it is their responsibility to provide all information and documentation necessary to obtain all forms of financial aid by the deadlines imposed by the school and the funding sources. Failure to do so may result in the student being required to provide immediate payment of all applicable charges.

    Working students who are eligible for company-sponsored tuition reimbursement are required to advise and provide appropriate documentation to the Financial Services office.

     

    Supplies

    The school maintains a list of materials needed during the program, but supplies will vary widely among programs and projects. This list is given to the student during the admission process or the first day of class. $500-$800 quarterly supply fees vary by program, class, and project.  These supplies are not charged or provided by the school.  The student is responsible for these costs.
     

    Book Provision for Pell Grant Eligible Students

    Effective July 1, 2011, Section 668.164(i) of the regulations under Title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended, requires that a school provide a way for a Federal Pell Grant eligible student to obtain or purchase required books and supplies by the seventh day of a payment period under certain conditions if the student were to have a Title IV credit balance. To satisfy that requirement, this institution provides required books and supplies to students through its online bookstore.

    Students may choose to opt out of this method and obtain books and supplies on their own. To do so the students will need to notify the Business Office prior to the start of the term.

     

    Past Due Accounts

    The student is obligated for tuition, books, and other fees for each period of enrollment. Any student who is delinquent in payments due to the school is subject to exclusion from school privileges including, but not limited to, receiving grade reports, issuing of transcripts, and participation in graduation ceremonies.  Students whose accounts are past due are subject to dismissal and/or referred to a collection agency at the discretion of the school.
     

    Financial Aid

    Financial Aid is available to assist for those who qualify to assist with paying for educational expenses. Financial assistance for qualified students may consist of federal grants and/or loans, which may supplement the student’s own contribution toward completing their educational program. The Creative Circus offers various financial assistance programs to qualified students including federal, state, local and private programs. Students interested in financial assistance should see the school’s Financial Aid Office.

    Applying for Student Financial Assistance
    All students seeking or applying for financial assistance must meet with a member of the school’s Financial Aid Office staff to complete the application process. During this process, the staff member will provide guidance to the student on how to access the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA, www.fafsa.ed.gov) for completion by the student. The Financial Aid Office staff will provide the student with any other forms necessary to determine the student’s eligibility and complete the application process. It is the student’s responsibility to provide all required documents in order to verify eligibility and process the application in a timely manner.
     

    Grants

    Grants are money awards that do not have to be repaid and are given to students based specifically on financial need.

    The Federal Pell Grant Program Provides federal grants to students who demonstrate calculated financial need. A student's Federal Pell Grant will vary depending upon his/her enrollment status (i.e. full-time, half-time, etc.). The Federal Pell Grant is considered to be the "floor" of the financial aid package, and may be combined with other forms of financial aid. Qualifications for the Federal Pell Grant are determined by the FAFSA.

    The maximum award for full-time enrollment for the 2019-2020 award year is $6,195.

     

    Loans

    There are several loan programs available. Loans must be repaid. The Creative Circus is dedicated to finding ways to help students make responsible borrowing decisions and keep students’ debts to manageable levels. Borrow only what you need to cover the cost of tuition, fees and books to ensure you are not taking on more debt than necessary. Remember, you are expected to repay your loan plus interest. Acquiring too much loan debt may be detrimental to your long-term financial health. The less you borrow, the less you will have to repay after graduation.

    A. William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program
    Loans made through this program are referred to as Direct Loans, because eligible students and parents borrow directly from the U. S. Department of Education at participating schools. A student must be enrolled at least halftime to be eligible for a loan. Direct Loans include the following:

    • Direct Subsidized Stafford Loans: Subsidized Stafford Loans are available to undergraduate students who display financial need. Financial need is determined by the results of the student’s FAFSA application and the school’s Cost of Attendance. The U. S. Department of Education pays (subsidizes) the interest that accrues on a Direct Subsidized Loan during the interest rate for loans first disbursed between July 1, 2019 and June 30, 2020 is fixed at 4.53% APR. First year dependent and independent undergraduate students may borrow up to $3,500; second year dependent and independent undergraduate students may borrow up to $4,500 and third year dependent and independent undergraduate students may borrow up to $5,500. 
    • Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans: Unsubsidized Stafford Loans are available to undergraduate and graduate students. There is no requirement for a student to demonstrate financial need. The student is responsible for paying the interest that accrues on the Direct Unsubsidized Loan. The interest rate for loans first disbursed between July 1, 2019 and June 30, 2020 is fixed at 4.53% APR. Independent students (and dependent students whose parents are unable to obtain a Direct PLUS loan) may borrow up to an additional $6,000 for first and second year loans, and an additional $7,000 for third year loans. Also, all dependent undergraduate students whose parents do not qualify for a Direct PLUS Loan may borrow up to an additional $2,000 of Direct Unsubsidized Loans.
    • Direct PLUS Loans: Direct PLUS loans are available to the parents, or adoptive parents, of undergraduate students. The PLUS loan allows parents to borrow to assist their dependent children in paying educational expenses. The interest rate for loans first disbursed between July 1, 2019 and June 30, 2020 is fixed at 7.08% APR. Payments on both principal and interest begin when the loan is fully disbursed. Parents may borrow up to the Cost of Attendance for the student’s program, less any other financial aid received. Federal PLUS loans are subject to credit check. Note: Direct PLUS loans are also available to graduate or professional students. 
       

    B. Federal Work Study Program
    The Federal Work Study Program (FWS) enables students to earn money for their educational expenses by working in part-time positions. Students are paid hourly for working generally twenty hours per week, depending upon the position. Federal Work Study students may work only in positions related to student services or their programs of study. Applications may be obtained from the Financial Services office and the application must be submitted to the Financial Services office. Students holding a bachelor's degree are eligible to participate in the FWS. Applicants may be required to go through an interview process.

     

    Vocational Rehabilitation

    A student with a physical or mental disability which may be a handicap to employment may be eligible for training services provided through the state government agency for Vocational Rehabilitation.  Students desiring further information should contact the admissions office or call Vocational Rehabilitation directly.
     

    Veterans Education Benefits

    Veterans, children, widows, widowers, and spouses of disabled or deceased veterans, and war orphans are eligible for educational benefits. The required application forms should be obtained, completed, and submitted to the school as far in advance of enrollment as possible, and may be obtained from the Veterans Administration office. Veteran benefits will be governed by the latest policies pertaining to the Veterans Administration regulations.

    Veterans and eligible persons using veterans’ benefits are measured academically based on the satisfactory progress thresholds defined in Standards of Satisfactory Progress (SAP) policy as are all students attending the school. Veterans’ benefits will be suspended for any students who are academically suspended from the school. Refer to the SAP policy section for details of this policy.

     

    Financial Aid Eligibility

    Student financial aid applicants must satisfy certain requirements in order to be able to receive and continue to use financial aid.  These requirements include, but are not limited to:
    • Fulfilling of all admission requirements;
    • Submitting of all documentation requested by the school or lender(s) or both;
    • Maintaining satisfactory academic progress in accordance with school policy;
    • Completing “aid specific” requirements, such as entrance and exit loan counseling.  

    In addition, graduating students who received federal student loans must complete exit loan counseling and meet all other graduation requirements before they will be considered a graduate and awarded a diploma or certificate.  Withdrawing students who used federal student loans must attend exit counseling.

     

    Cancellation and Refund Policy

    The SCHOOL has adopted this Cancellation and Refund Policy for all of its campuses. The reason for a student’s cancellation or withdrawal does not affect how this Cancellation and Refund Policy is applied.

    Applicants who have not visited the school prior to enrollment will have the opportunity to withdraw without penalty within three business days following either the regularly scheduled orientation procedures or following a tour of the school facilities and inspection of equipment where training and services are provided.

    All monies paid by an applicant will be refunded if requested within three days after signing an enrollment agreement and making an initial payment or prior to the end of the drop/add period, whichever is later.

    Written notice of cancellation or withdrawal will take place on the date the letter is postmarked or in a case where the notice is hand carried, it shall occur on the date the notice is delivered to the SCHOOL. The date of acceptance will be the delivery date of the notice of acceptance. If the notice is delivered by mail, it will be the postmarked date of the letter of acceptance. Written notice of cancellation or withdrawal is not required for payment of refund.

    This section of the Cancellation and Refund Policy determines the amount of institutional charges that the SCHOOL has earned, and for which the student must pay, based on the student’s attendance. For purposes of determining the refund or the amount a student owes for the time attended, the last date of attendance is used. A student shall be deemed to have withdrawn when any of the following occurs: (a) the student notifies the SCHOOL of the student’s withdrawal or the actual date of withdraw, (b) the SCHOOL terminates the student’s enrollment as provided in the ENROLLMENT AGREEMENT or (c) the SCHOOL withdraws the student if the student fails to attend as outlined by the attendance policy.

    When such withdrawal occurs prior to the end of the drop/add period of the initial period of enrollment, all tuition, fees, and other charges will be refunded in full.

    If a student ceases attendance or provides notice of cancellation or withdrawal after the start of the period charged, but at or before completion of 60% of the period charged (75% for students attending in Texas), the amount charged for tuition for the completed portion of the course(s) shall not exceed the prorated portion of the total tuition charged for the period arrived at by multiplying the total tuition charged for the period by the ratio of the number of days attended to the total number of days in the period.

    Example: Assume that a student, upon enrollment in a 70 day (10 week) term with the following costs $3,884 for tuition and $540 Program Fee, as specified in the ENROLLMENT AGREEMENT, withdraws after attending 25 days. The pro rata refund to the student would be $2496.86 based on the calculation set forth below:

    $3,884            ÷ 70 Days × 45 Days Remaining          = $2496.86
    Amount charged                                                     Actual Refund Amount

    If the student ceases to attend the SCHOOL after completing 60% of the period charged (75% for students attending in Texas), the student will be charged 100% of the tuition and charges applicable for all courses in the payment/academic period.

     

    Return to Title IV

    SUMMARY OF THE REQUIREMENTS OF 34 CFR 668.22 - TREATMENT OF TITLE  IV AID WHEN A STUDENT  WITHDRAWS

    The law specifies how The Creative Circus must determine the amount of Title IV program assistance that a student earns if the student withdraws from school. The Title IV programs that are covered by this law are: Federal Pell Grants, Iraq Afghanistan Service Grants, Academic Competitiveness Grants, National SMART grants, TEACH Grants, Stafford Loans, PLUS Loans, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOGs), and Federal Perkins Loans.  Please note that The Creative Circus does not participate in all of these Title IV programs.

    When a student withdraws during his or her payment period or period of enrollment the amount of Title IV program assistance that a student has earned up to that point is determined by a specific formula.

    If a student did not receive all of the funds that the student earned, the student may be due a Post-withdrawal disbursement. The school may automatically use all or a portion of the student’s Post-withdrawal disbursement of grant funds for tuition and fees. If the student’s Post-withdrawal disbursement includes loan funds, the school must get the student’s permission before The Creative Circus can disburse them. The student may choose to decline some or all of the loan funds so that the student doesn’t incur additional debt. However if the student owes a balance to the school, the student may want to authorize the loan disbursement to pay those charges in order to avoid having a payment to the school in addition to the Federal Loan payment.

    While The Creative Circus will automatically use all or a portion of the student’s Post-withdrawal disbursement of grant funds for tuition and fees, the school needs the student’s permission to use these funds for any other school charges. If the student did not give permission, the student will be offered the funds.

    There are some Title IV funds that cannot be disbursed to the student once he or she withdraws because of other eligibility requirements. For example, a first-time, first-year undergraduate student who has not completed the first 30 days of his or her program before withdrawing will not receive any Direct Loan funds that the student would have received had the student remained enrolled past the 30th day.

    If a student receives (or the school or parent receives on the student’s behalf) excess Title IV program funds that must be returned, the school must return a portion of the excess equal to the lesser of:

    1. The student’s institutional charges multiplied by the unearned percentage of the student’s funds, or
    2. The entire amount of excess funds.

    The regulations require that the school return Title IV funds to the programs from which the student received aid during the payment period or period of enrollment as applicable, in the following order, up to the net amount disbursed from each source:

    1. Unsubsidized Direct Stafford loans (other than PLUS loans).
    2. Subsidized Direct Stafford loans.
    3. Federal Perkins loans.
    4. Direct PLUS loans.
    5. Federal Pell Grants
    6. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG) Federal Teach Grants for which a Return is required.
    7. Iraq Afghanistan Service Grant for which a return is required.

    Refunds to the student or any of the Title IV or State programs will be paid within 45 days from the withdrawal/termination date (or any shorter period required by applicable law).

    If the school is not required to return all of the excess funds, the student must return the remaining amount. Any loan funds that the student must return, the student (or parent for a PLUS Loan) must repay in accordance with the terms of the promissory note. That is, the borrower makes scheduled payments to the holder of the loan over a period of time. Any amount of unearned grant funds that the student must return is called a grant overpayment.  Any overpayment as a result of withdrawal will be returned to the Department of Education on the student’s behalf.  However, the return of this overpayment may result in a debt owed to The Creative Circus. The requirements for Title IV program funds when a student withdraws are separate from the school’s refund policy. Therefore, a student may still owe funds to the school to cover unpaid institutional charges that the school was required to return.

    For purposes of calculating a clock hour return to Title IV that has externships or clinic courses without a defined schedule in CampusVue, the scheduled hours used in the return to Title IV calculation will be determined by using the total contact hours for the course divided by the number of weeks in the externship or clinic courses.  If a daily hour subdivision is needed, to determine a student’s LDA, a week in an externship or clinic course will be divided by 5 days.  This is only in the case a student drops in that course and they need to calculate scheduled hours up to LDA.


    [1] This policy explains the requirements for the return of Title IV funds, which is part of the institutional refund policy. 
     

    Definition of Withdraw and Return to Title IV

    For purposes of calculating Return to Title IV, a student is considered to have withdrawn from a payment period or period of enrollment if—  

    In the case of a program that is measured in credit hours, the student does not complete all the days in the payment period or period of enrollment that the student was scheduled to complete.

    For answers to questions about Title IV program funds, students should contact one of the school’s Financial Services Officers.

     

    Return to Title IV and Recording of Attendance

    For purposes of calculating Return to Title IV, because this institution voluntarily records attendance in all programs and classes, the school is determined to be a school that is required to take attendance, and as such, uses the student’s last recorded day of attendance in determining the percentage of Title IV aid earned for the payment period or period of enrollment.
     

    Career Services

    The primary purpose of Career Services is to help The Creative Circus graduates obtain employment in their areas of specialization. Satisfactory completion of program course work by the student is the first step in the employment process. The Career Services office provides specific training in various job-seeking skills through required coursework, optional training sessions, graduation seminars, and individual advisement. The Career Services staff works with each student throughout his or her program to determine areas of employment interest and to explore placement options. This assistance continues through graduation and for alumni. Students are required to provide information that enables them to partner with Career Services in achieving their career goals. Students and graduates are notified of appropriate employment opportunities as they arise. Although it is impossible to guarantee each graduate a job, the Career Services office works to provide job leads and to assist the student in the placement process.
     

    Success and Professional Growth Orientation

    The campus provides a success and professional growth program required for students enrolled in hybrid, online, and technology-enabled content programs. The program acquaints new students with what the school expects of the student and what the student can expect from the school. The program is designed to provide the opportunity for advisement on academic matters, registering for classes, and answering questions. All new students are required to participate in the orientation program.
     

    Advising Services

    Advising services are available to assist students in resolving educational, career, and vocational problems. General personal concerns relating directly to academic success can be addressed on campus whereas more serious concerns will be referred to the appropriate outside agency. The Director of Education, Student Resources Coordinator, Registrar, and Program Directors can help students plan their educational programs as well as adjust to the demands of school. 
     

    Tutorial Assistance

     The school provides assistance for students experiencing academic difficulties.  Faculty will make every effort to identify students in need of assistance.  Students are urged to take the initiative in seeking out-of-class help and to discuss their difficulties with their instructors.  Tutors are available to work with students on an “as needed” basis at no charge to the student.
     

    Health Services

    The Creative Circus has no health services located at the school. However, hospitals, clinics, and physicians are located nearby. The school seeks to assist students who have special health problems or limitations in the attainment of their educational goals. Services are provided in accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

    In the event of accident or illness on campus, the Director of Education should be notified immediately. Students who become ill, injured, or develop health problems requiring professional attention are referred to the emergency room of the hospital or to a local physician in accordance with instructions given by the student or the student’s family. In an emergency situation that requires immediate attention, a student may be taken directly to the hospital.

    Environmental health and safety on the campus are the responsibility of the school. It is the policy of the school to have all facilities comply with the requirements of the state and local building codes, the board of health, and fire department regulations.

     

    School Closings Due to Weather

    If the institution is closed due to bad weather, or for any other reason determined by the Executive Director, announcements will be made via 11Alive.com, and WXIA-TV Channel 11. In addition, a notice will appear on our website & our social channels.
     

    Emergency Information

     In the event of a fire or other disaster that requires evacuation of the campus, students should vacate classrooms and other areas of the building in an orderly fashion and gather at the designated locations so that the instructor may take attendance.  Re-entry into the building is allowed only when the all-clear signal has been given.  Students will find evacuation routes posted in each classroom.
     

    Library

    The school maintains a learning resource system of curriculum-related resources and leisure materials for use by all students.  The library holdings at The Creative Circus are concentrated in current hard copy and computer-accessed general reference and periodical materials. In support of the general education offerings of the school, the library provides appropriate references in a variety of formats.
     

    Housing

    As most students reside within commuting distance, the school does not maintain dormitory facilities. However, students desiring housing accommodations should contact the Director of Admissions or Student Service Manager for information.
     

    Publications and Announcements

    Announcements can be read via the student portal. Announcements and updates are also posted on the bulletin boards throughout the corridors, classrooms, and student lounge. Student should check the student portal and bulletin boards periodically for any notices and/or special announcements.

     

    Hours of Operation

    Classes are scheduled Monday through Friday, from 9:30 am to 9:30 pm.  Administrative offices are open Monday through Friday. Hours for each department are posted on office doors or near the offices.

     

    Crime Awareness

    Students are to report to the Director of Education, or in his/her absence to a faculty/staff member, any criminal activities taking place on the premises or in the parking lot of The Creative Circus. This includes any school-sponsored function. Such actions will then be reported to the proper authorities.
     

    Campus Visitors

    Visitors to the school must check in at the reception desk upon arrival.  Students are invited to have their parents, relatives, or friends tour the campus.  If visitors have questions, they are welcome to meet with the staff.
     

    Children

    Children are not allowed to accompany a student to class or to be left unattended on campus. If a student brings a child to class, the instructor should inform the student of the policy and ask him or her to remove the child from the classroom. If a child is left unattended, the Director of Education or other administrator should be notified. The Director of Education will then locate the parent and inform him or her of the policy. The school assumes no liability for injuries incurred by minors while on campus.
     

    Policy for Canines on Campus

    Canines are allowed on premises (this means inside and outside the school building) with some necessary limitations. Upon entering, pet owners must provide the following to the Director of Education:

    1.    Shot records from the Veterinarian.
    2.    Proof that the dog has been spayed or neutered (if not already on file).

    Upon approval, students are allowed to bring their canine to The Creative Circus. Failure to abide by any of the following rules will result in revocation of canine privileges: All dogs must be on a leash and in the presence of their owner. If the dog has an accident, it is the owner’s responsibility to clean up the mess. If the dog is a habitual offender, as determined by the Director of Education, we reserve the right to revoke the canine from coming back to school until the dog is house-trained. All dogs must behave in an appropriate manner while at The Circus. No rough-housing with other dogs, barking or concerning behavior towards other dogs or humans. The Director of Education reserves the right to ban any dog from The Creative Circus for any reason.

     

    Student Code of Conduct

    Statement of Shared Responsibility
    Students, faculty, staff and administration constitute a community of learners.  Collectively, we share responsibility for exchanging knowledge and information, creating a culture that respects and values diversity and for maintaining an environment of accountability.  Within the challenging and supporting learning environment at The Creative Circus, students of all ages, ethnicities, religions, genders, abilities, socio-economic backgrounds and sexual orientations are welcome to engage in the process of preparation for career readiness, active citizenship and lifelong learning.

    In order to realize its mission, all members of the The Creative Circus community have a responsibility to promote and the right to expect:

    Respect for Persons: 
    The opportunity to ask questions and to express opinions is fundamental to the learning process.  Diversity in perspective strengthens the learning environment for all participants.  All members of the community will demonstrate respect for others while communicating a point of view and while allowing others to do the same, ensuring that the campus is free from intimidation and harassment.  Disagreements among members of the community are expected to be resolved through a process that preserves mutual respect.

    Respect for the Learning Process:
    Community members should be committed to a journey of continuous improvement for themselves and for others.  Each individual brings with him/her a unique set of knowledge, skills, abilities and experiences that add richness to the learning environment.  Individuals will progress at their own rate, within the approved parameters of the curriculum, capitalizing upon their own preferred style of learning in order to make progress on their journey.  The unique journey of each individual should be encouraged and honored. The Student Code of Conduct has been developed to ensure that the learning process is not inhibited or disrupted for any individual or group of individuals.

    Respect for the Learning Environment:
    The physical and virtual classroom, the institutional facilities and the campus, as well as all equipment and learning materials constitute the learning environment. Expectations for adherence to the Student Code of Conduct apply to those instances where the learning experience extends beyond the institution, such as situations that involve a field trip or an internship/externship/clinical/practicum. Equipment and learning materials vary by program. The safety of all members of the learning environment is of the utmost concern to the institution. Students must adhere to the dress code requirements for their program of study. All members of the learning community will utilize the resources provided by the institution as instructed and with caution, making campus officials aware of issues associated with facilities, equipment or learning materials.

    Respect for Academic Integrity:
    All members of the community are required to adhere to institutional standards of academic integrity. One of the greatest values of participating in a community of learners is the opportunity to learn from others; however, individuals must acknowledge the sources of the information that are used to advance a point of view. Academic misconduct involves dishonesty or deception in the fulfillment of academic requirements. It includes, but is not limited to, cheating, plagiarism, unpermitted collaboration, forged attendance, using advantages not approved by the instructor, knowingly allowing another student to plagiarize or cheat from one’s work or submitting the same assignment for multiple courses without the knowledge of the instructor.

    Student Code of Conduct Policy Statement
    The Creative Circus affirms its commitment to provide an engaging learning environment and promote the exchange of ideas among the members of the learning community.  All individuals who come to The Creative Circus to work and study will be accepted as unique individuals worthy or making a valuable contribution to the learning environment.  Discrimination, disruption or harassment on the basis of age, ethnicity, religion, gender, ability, socio-economic background or sexual orientation will not be tolerated.

    The Creative Circus accepts responsibility for communicating these values to students, faculty, staff, administration and the community served by the institution.  The success of the policy to protect the learning environment and those engaged in the learning process is dependent upon the willingness of members of the community to make known behaviors and conduct that violate the policy.

    A student found to have committed any one of the following Student Code of Conduct Offenses will be subject to the full range of sanctions including written reprimand, suspension and expulsion.

    Student Code of Conduct Offenses
    Academic Misconduct –Dishonesty or deception in the fulfillment of academic requirements. It includes, but is not limited to, cheating, plagiarism, unpermitted collaboration, forged attendance, using advantages not approved by the instructor, knowingly allowing another student to plagiarize or cheat from one’s work or submitting the same assignment for multiple courses without the knowledge of the instructor.

    Dating Violence
    – Violence committed an individual (A) who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim; and (B) where the existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on a consideration of the following factors: (i) The length of the relationship (ii) The type of relationship (iii) The frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.  This offense applies to any such illegal activity by a current student, staff or faculty member.

    Domestic Violence
    –  Felony or misdemeanor crimes of violence committed by a current or former spouse of the victim, by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common, by a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse, by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction receiving grant monies, or by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction. This offense applies to any such illegal activity by a current student, staff or faculty member.

    Dishonesty
    – Provision and/or submission of false information to the institution by forgery, alteration or misuse of documents or records, falsifying a written or oral statement or submission of false identification to the institution.

    Failure to Adhere to Dress Code –
    Programs of study are created to develop the knowledge, skills and competencies required for an identified set of career outcomes. As such, dress code standards that replicate the work environment may be imposed upon students enrolled in particular programs of study. The Dress Code may include requirements to wear a specific uniform. Alternatively, the Dress Code may limit attire that is worn to school or to school - related activities to defined standard, such as business attire or business casual attire.  Finally, the Dress Code may necessitate removal of piercings and/or requirements to cover tattoos.

    Mental or Bodily Harm to Self
    – Conduct that causes harm or has the potential to cause harm to one’s self including the intentional infliction of mental or bodily harm upon one’s self or taking reckless but not accidental, action which could result in mental or bodily harm.

    Mental or Bodily Harm to Others
    – Conduct that causes harm or has the potential to cause harm to another individual, including:
    • Behavior that intentionally inflicts mental or bodily harm on another person;
    • Behavior that attempts to inflict mental or bodily harm on another person;
    • Taking reckless, but not accidental, action that could result in infliction of mental or bodily harm on another person;
    • Causing another individual to believe that the offender may cause mental or bodily harm to them;
    • Sexual misconduct;
    • Any act that demeans or degrades another individual; and/or
    • Coercion of an individual to inflict mental or bodily harm to another person.
    Stalking – Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to (A) fear for his or her safety or the safety of others; or (B) suffer substantial emotional distress.  Stalking may include non-consensual communication, including in-person communication or contact, surveillance, telephone calls, voice messages, text messages, email messages, social networking site postings, instant messages, postings of pictures or information on websites, written letters, gifts or any other undesired communication that elicits fear. 

    Sex Discrimination and Harassment  – Conduct that encompasses discrimination on the basis of an individual’s sex in any aspect of employment or education, including but not limited to,
    • Hiring and firing;
    •  Compensation, assignment, or classification of employees;
    • Transfer, promotion, layoff, or recall;
    • Job advertisements;
    • Recruitment;
    • Testing;
    • Grading;
    • Acceptance or participation in an academic program or school activity;
    • Use of employer's facilities;
    • Training programs;
    • Fringe benefits;
    • Pay, retirement plans, and disability leave; or other terms and conditions of employment; and
    • Engaging in conduct that has the purpose or effect of substantially interfering with an individual's academic or work performance, or of creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive environment in which to work or learn. 

    Sexual harassment, including sexual violence, is a form of discrimination; it is illegal.  No employee or student, either in the workplace or in the academic environment, should be subject to unwelcome verbal or physical conduct that is sexual in nature. Sexual harassment does not refer to occasional compliments of a socially acceptable nature. It refers to behavior of a sexual nature that is not welcome, that is personally offensive, and that interferes with performance.  It is expected that students, faculty and staff will treat one another with respect.  All students, faculty, staff, and other members of the campus community, including intern/extern/practicum sites, are subject to this policy. 

    Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other visual, verbal or physical conduct of a sexual or gender bias nature, constitute sexual harassment when: 

    • Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual's employment or academic status;
    • Submission to or rejection of the conduct is used as a basis for academic or employment decisions or evaluations, or permission to participate in an activity; or
    • The conduct has the purpose or effect of substantially interfering with an individual's academic or work performance, or of creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive environment in which to work or learn.

     Sexual harassment may take many forms-subtle and indirect, or blatant and overt, including but not limited to, the following:  

    • It may occur between individuals of the opposite sex or of the same sex;
    • It may occur between students, between peers and/or co-workers, or between individuals in an unequal power relationship (such as by a supervisor with regard to a supervised employee or an instructor regarding a current student);
    • It may be aimed at coercing an individual to participate in an unwanted sexual relationship or it may have the effect of causing an individual to change behavior or work performance;
    • It may consist of repeated actions or may even arise from a single incident if sufficiently severe;
    • It may also rise to the level of a criminal offense, such as battery or sexual violence. 

    Sexual violence is a physical act perpetrated against a person's will or where a person is incapable of giving consent due to the victim's use of drugs or alcohol. An individual also may be unable to give consent due to an intellectual or other disability. Sexual violence includes, but is not limited to, rape, sexual assault, sexual battery, and sexual coercion.

    Determining what constitutes sexual harassment under this policy is dependent upon the specific facts and the context in which the conduct occurs. Some conduct may be inappropriate, unprofessional, and/or subject to disciplinary action, but would not fall under the definition of sexual harassment. Examples of unwelcome conduct of a sexual or gender related nature that may constitute sexual harassment may, but do not necessarily, include, and are not limited to:
     

    • Rape, sexual assault, sexual battery, sexual coercion or other sexual violence;
    • Sexually explicit or gender related statements, comments, questions, jokes, innuendoes, anecdotes, or gestures;
    • Other than customary handshakes, uninvited touching, patting, hugging, or purposeful brushing against a person's body or other inappropriate touching of an individual's body;
    • Remarks of a sexual nature about a person's clothing or body;
    • Use of electronic mail or computer dissemination of sexually oriented, sex-based communications;
    • Sexual advances, whether or not they involve physical touching;
    • Requests for sexual favors in exchange for actual or promised job or educational benefits, such as favorable reviews, salary increases, promotions, increased benefits, continued employment, grades, favorable assignments, letters of recommendation;
    • Displaying sexually suggestive objects, pictures, magazines, cartoons, or screen savers;
    • Inquiries, remarks, or discussions about an individual's sexual experiences or activities and other written or oral references to sexual conduct. 

     Any employee or student bringing a discrimination or sexual harassment complaint or assisting in the investigation of such a complaint will not be subjected to retaliation in terms and conditions of employment and/or academic standing, nor discriminated against, terminated, or expelled because of the complaint. Intentionally providing false information, however, is grounds for discipline. 

    "Retaliation" may include, but is not limited to, such conduct as:  

    • The denial of adequate personnel to perform duties;
    • Frequent replacement of members of the staff;
    • Frequent and undesirable changes in the location of an office;
    • The refusal to assign meaningful work;
    • Unwarranted disciplinary action;
    • Unfair work performance evaluations;
    • A reduction in pay;
    • The denial of a promotion;
    • Dismissal;
    • Transfer;
    • Frequent changes in working hours or workdays;
    • Unfair grade;
    • Unfavorable reference letter. 

    Determining what constitutes discrimination under this policy will be evaluated on a case by case basis and depends upon the specific facts and the context in which the conduct occurs. Some conduct may be inappropriate, unprofessional, and/or subject to disciplinary action, but would not fall under the definition of discrimination. Individuals who violate this policy are subject to discipline up to and including termination and/or expulsion, in accordance with the The Creative Circus’s Student Code of Conduct. Other, lesser sanctions may be imposed, depending on the circumstances.   Victims of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking should contact his or her Executive Director to request changes to academic and working situations and how to request protective measures and receive support resources as set forth in the campus Annual Security Reports.

    Discrimination
    - Civilly, criminally or administratively prohibited unequal treatment of a person based upon age, ethnicity, religion, gender, ability, socio-economic background, veteran status or sexual orientation.

    Disruption/Obstruction – Obstructing or interfering with any institutional functions or activities, including instruction within a physical or virtual classroom.

    False Report of Emergency
    – Causing, making or circulating a false report or warning of fire, explosion, crime or other threat to safety.

    Destruction of Property –
    Intentionally or recklessly, but not accidentally, damaging, destroying, defacing or tampering with institutional property, property associated with the institution including internship/externship sites or the property of any person on or associated with the campus.

    Theft or Possession of Stolen Property or Service –
    Taking an item or utilizing a service without consent of an official of the institution or possessing property that can reasonably be determined to have been stolen from the campus for from an employee or student of the campus.

    T
    respassing –Forcible or unauthorized entry into any institutional facilities or facilities associated with the institution.

    Possession of Weapons or Dangerous Materials
    – Unauthorized possession of a weapon or dangerous materials, including, but not limited to firearms, compressed-air guns, pellet guns, BB guns, knives, explosive devices, incendiary devices, fireworks, ammunition or any other dangerous materials.

    Manufacture, Distribution, Sale, Offer for Sale, Possession or Misuse of Drugs or Alcohol –
    Manufacture, distribution, sale, offer for sale, possession or use of any illegal drug or narcotic or possession or use of alcohol while on campus or engaged in any school related activities.

    Use of Tobacco Products or Electronic Cigarettes in Unapproved   Locations -
    Smoking or use of tobacco products or electronic cigarettes in locations other than those approved for that purpose.

    Violation of Criminal Law –
    An alleged violation of any federal, state or local criminal law where the conduct of a student interferes with the institution’s exercise of its educational objectives or responsibilities.

    Misuse or Abuse of Computers or Computer Networks
    –Misuse, alteration, tampering with or abuse of any computer, computer system, service, program, data, or network, including telephone or computer lines and wireless networks. Abuse includes utilization of school computers or Internet access in order to access pornographic web sites or to distribute pornographic material.

    Misuse of Safety Equipment –
    Unauthorized use of or alteration of firefighting equipment, safety devices or other emergency safety equipment.

    Sanctions
    Enrollment into the institution signifies the student’s agreement to comply with the Student Code of Conduct.  Failure to comply with the Code of Conduct will result in appropriate disciplinary sanctions. 

    The Student Code of Conduct has been developed to ensure that the learning process is not inhibited or disrupted for any individual or group of individuals. The Code of Conduct additionally serves as a mechanism for educating members of the learning community about appropriate standards of behavior.  In the event that a violation of the Code of Conduct occurs, the school will strive to utilize the incident as a teachable moment, imposing fair and progressive discipline.  However, should an individual commit an egregious violation of the Student Code of Conduct, the school has the responsibility to impose the strictest of sanctions upon the student, up to and including suspension or expulsion.

    Disciplinary sanctions are described below.

    Verbal Warning
    A verbal warning is an official conversation held between the Director of Education, or the Executive Director, and the student, making the student aware of an incidence of unacceptable behavior that is in violation of the Student Code of Conduct. A notation will be entered into the Student Information System but documentation does not become part of the student’s permanent record. Any further misconduct may result in more serious disciplinary sanctions up to and including suspension or expulsion.

    Written Reprimand
    A reprimand is an official written notification of unacceptable behavior that is in violation of the Student Code of Conduct.  The reprimand will be entered into the Student Information System and will become a permanent document in the student’s file. The student will be asked to sign the document and will be provided a copy of the reprimand.  Any further misconduct may result in more serious disciplinary sanctions up to and including suspension or expulsion.

    Disciplinary Probation
    Disciplinary probation is a conditional status imposed for a designated period of time within a term prohibiting the student from being present without permission on the campus or any property associated with the campus, including internship/externship sites.  The period of time may not exceed 14 calendar days.  Disciplinary probation requires completion of a Code of Conduct Violation Form by an instructor and an approval by the Director of Education or Executive Director.  Disciplinary probation may be used in those limited instances where a student is asked to leave a class for the duration of the day or until the Procedural Interview is conducted. The Procedural Interview should be scheduled within two business days of the incident. A copy of the form should be mailed and/or emailed to the student, indicating when he/she may return to class.  The Disciplinary Probation Form becomes a permanent part of the student file and should also be notated in the Student Information System.  The student must meet with the Director of Education or Executive Director to sign the form prior to returning to class. Any further misconduct may result in more serious disciplinary sanctions up to and including suspension or expulsion.

    Suspension
    Suspension is the loss of privileges of enrollment at the institution for a designated period of time and prohibits the student from being present without permission on the property of the campus or any property associated with the campus, including internship/externship/clinical/practicum sites. As a result of being placed on suspension, the student will be awarded a grade of W for any course in which they are currently enrolled. Regardless of whether or not the student is subsequently allowed to return to school to complete the program of study, the student is responsible for payment of tuition and fees and/or repayment of financial aid. The student shall be notified of the suspension in writing. The notification of suspension indicates the earliest possible date, in a future term, in which the student may consider submission of a request to return to school.  The student is entitled to an opportunity to appeal the suspension. The notification of suspension becomes a permanent part of the student record and also must be noted in the Student Information System. Any further misconduct may result in more serious disciplinary sanctions. The Office of the Chief Academic Officer or the Chief Compliance Officer of Ancora Education must approve suspensions before they are imposed and before a student is notified.

    Expulsion
    Expulsion is the permanent loss of privilege of enrollment at the institution and prohibits the student from being present without permission on the campus or on any property associated with the campus.  The student will be unable to complete his/her program of study with the institution. As a result of being expelled, the student will be awarded a grade of W for any course in which they are currently enrolled. The student is responsible for payment of tuition and fees and/or repayment of financial aid. The student is entitled to an opportunity to appeal the expulsion. The notification of expulsion becomes a permanent part of the student record and also must be noted in the Student Information System. In the event that a student appeal results in retraction of the expulsion, any further misconduct may result in more serious disciplinary sanctions up to and including suspension or expulsion. The Office of the Chief Academic Officer or the Chief Compliance Officer of Ancora Education must approve expulsions before they are imposed and before a student is notified. 

    Procedures
    Filing of a Conduct Violation Form
    Any member of the learning community (students, faculty or staff) may file a Code of Conduct Violation Form to initiate the process to respond to an alleged violation of the Student Code of Conduct. The Code of Conduct Violation Form may be found on the Campus Connect site under Academic Forms.  The individual who files the Code of Conduct Violation Form becomes the complainant.  The student being charged with the alleged offense is referred to as the accused.

    All Code of Conduct Violation Forms are first reviewed by the Director of Education.  If the Director of Education determines that sufficient evidence exists to warrant further exploration of the complaint, the next step is for the accused to be scheduled for a Procedural Interview. The accused is sent a copy of the Code of Conduct Violation Form, via email and/or UPS or FedEx, providing a receipt and proof of delivery, which includes a detailed description of the incident, accompanied by a Notification of Violation Letter that indicates the date and time of the procedural interview.  The Notification of Violation Letter provides details concerning the student’s rights and explains the entire process for resolving the alleged violation.

    Procedural Interview
    Any student charged with a violation of the Student Code of Conduct will be scheduled for a Procedural Interview with the Director of Education. In those instances where the Director of Education has filed the Code of Conduct Violation Form, the Executive Director should also be present for the Procedural Interview. The accused is sent a Notification of Violation Letter that indicates the date and time of the Procedural Interview, along with a copy of the Conduct Violation Form, describing the alleged violation.  The Procedural Interview should be scheduled within five (5) business days of receipt the Code of Conduct Violation Form.

    The accused must attend the Procedural Interview.  If the accused fails to appear for the scheduled Procedural Interview, one attempt will be made to reschedule the meeting. The rescheduled meeting shall occur within ten (10) business days of the receipt of the Code of Conduct Violation Form.  If the student again fails to appear for the Procedural Interview, the Director of Education may move forward with the determination of the sanction.

    The purpose of the Procedural Interview is to provide the accused with the opportunity to discuss the allegation that resulted in the filing of the Code of Conduct Violation Form. The Director of Education and/or the Executive Director will begin the meeting by delineating the student’s rights and options, as well as the potential sanctions that may be imposed for the alleged violation.  The accused will have an opportunity to admit or deny the charge made against him/her in the Procedural Interview.  The complainant also has the opportunity to attend the Procedural Interview either in person or via conference call.

    In the event that the accused admits to the charge filed against him/her, the Director of Education and/or the Executive Director will determine the sanction during the Procedural Interview.  The sanction will be notated on a copy of the original Code of Conduct Violation Form. The Code of Conduct Violation Form will then be signed by the Director of Education and/or the Executive Director. The student will be required to sign and date the form as well. The Code of Conduct Violation Form with the original signatures will be placed in the student file; the student will be provided with a copy of the signed form.  The Director of Education will enter a notation in Contact Manager within the Student Information System.

    The accused may deny the alleged violation of the Student Code of Conduct and request a Hearing to further explore the facts concerning the alleged violation.  If a hearing is requested, the date and time of the hearing are determined during the Procedural Interview and they are documented on a copy of the original Code of Conduct Violation Form.  The student is provided a copy of the updated Code of Code of Conduct Violation Form with this information as well as a copy of the Hearing Guide.

    Hearing Procedures
    The purpose of a hearing is to provide a forum for the complainant and the accused to present their case regarding the alleged violation of the Student Code of Conduct.  The Executive Director serves as the Hearing Authority and will ultimately determine whether or not the alleged violation is proven.  Please note that the definition of Hearing Procedures proceeding does not include communications and meetings between officials and victims concerning accommodations or protective measures to be provided to a victim.

    The Executive Director or otherwise designated Hearing Authority will begin the Hearing by explaining the accused’s rights and will assure that fairness will be observed throughout the hearing. Attendees of the hearing are limited to the Executive Director or designee, the complainant and the accused.

    The complainant will be given the opportunity to state the main points of the violation, providing evidence supplemented with statements by witnesses. After the complainant concludes his/her presentation, the accused will have the opportunity to state his/her case. The Executive Director or designee may question both the complainant and accused.

    After all evidence and testimony has been presented, the Executive Director will determine whether or not the allegation is warranted.  If the accused is found not to be in violation, the case will be dismissed and the Code of Conduct Violation Form will be documented accordingly and the student will be provided with a copy.

    If the accused is found to be in violation of the Student Code of Conduct, the Executive Director will dismiss the complainant and the accused, indicating that notification of the sanction will be communicated to the student at a specified date and time in the office of the Executive Director.

    As the Hearing Authority, the Executive Director or designee will consider the following when determining the sanction to be imposed:
     

    • Statements from witnesses and evidence presented during the hearing;
    • Seriousness of the violation;
    • Prior disciplinary record of the student;
    • Academic record; and
    • Student progress against program of study. 

    Upon reaching a decision, the Executive Director is expected to update the Conduct Violation Form by indicating the sanction that will be imposed as a result of the violation of the Student Code of Conduct. The Executive Director then meets with the student at the predetermined date and time to discuss the sanction and consequences of any repeat violation of the Student Code of Conduct.  The student is required to sign the form and is provided a copy.  At the same time the student is notified of the outcome of the hearing, a copy of the updated Conduct Violation Form will be provided to the complainant. The Executive Director is expected to make a notation in Contact Manager in the Student Information System and returns the hard copy of the Code of Conduct Violation Form to the student file.

    In the event that the Executive Director determines either suspension or expulsion to be the appropriate sanction, the Code of Conduct Violation Form should be completed accordingly and emailed to the Office of the Chief Academic Officer and the Chief Compliance Officer.  Upon approval from either the Office of the Chief Academic Officer or the Chief Compliance Officer, the Executive Director may proceed with the suspension or expulsion.

    Appeals
    The accused and/or complainant have the right to request an appeal by notifying the Executive Director or Director of Education of his/her intent to do so within three business days after receipt of the written notification of the sanction.  Appeals may be filed for the following reasons: 

    • Inappropriate sanction; or
    • New evidence that was not available at the time of the hearing has become available and is found to be substantial enough to change the outcome of the hearing. 

    The Appeal Board should be comprised of the Executive Director, Director of Education, and three other members of the administrative staff of the institution.  In the event that the complainant is a member of the Appeal Board, that individual will recuse him/herself from the decision-making process. The Appeal Board meets in a closed session, within a reasonable period of time, and either grants or denies the appeal by a majority vote. In the event that there is a tie, due to absence of a member of the Appeal Board, the Executive Director will determine the outcome. In the event that the Executive Director was the complainant, the Director of Education will determine the outcome. If the appeal is granted, the sanction may be changed.

    The individual filing the appeal will be notified in writing, utilizing the Code of Conduct Violation Form, of the decision of the Appeal Board within a reasonable period of time. The notification will be emailed and/or sent through the U.S. Postal Service. A hard copy of the form will be placed in the student file and the Director of Education will enter notes in the Contact Manager Field within the Student Information System.

    Re-enrollment After Suspension
    Students who have been suspended from the institution must petition to return to school after the specified period of time has elapsed. A Request to Re-enroll After Suspension Form is accessible from the office of the Director of Education.  Students who have been suspended must contact the Director of Education for permission to return to the campus or to request that a copy of the form be emailed or mailed. The Petition is submitted to the Director of Education but must be unanimously approved by the Appeal Board.  Re-enrollment may be granted but any repeat instance of violation of the Student Code of Conduct will be grounds for permanent dismissal from the institution.

    Compliance with the Student Discipline Policy and Procedure provisions does not constitute a violation of section 444 of the General Education Provisions Act (20 U.S.C.1232g), commonly known as the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA).

     

    Non-Harassment Policy

     The school will not permit, tolerate or condone harassment against any individual for any reason, including, but not limited to, harassment based on race, color, religion, national origin, sex (including pregnancy), age, disability, veteran status or any other status protected by applicable law. Comments, conduct, or innuendoes that might be perceived by others as offensive or harassing are wholly inappropriate and are to be strictly avoided. This policy applies to students, company employees, customers, vendors and visitors to the premises. The school intends to provide a school environment that is pleasant, healthy, comfortable and free of intimidation, hostility or other offenses that might interfere with a student’s educational performance.

     

     Employees and students must avoid offensive or inappropriate behavior in school or employment‐related relationships and are responsible for ensuring that all student‐employee and employment‐related relationships remain professional and free from harassment at all times.

     Employees and students must avoid offensive or inappropriate behavior in school. Relationships will remain professional and free from harassment at all times, this includes, employment‐related relationships and student‐employee and employment‐related relationships.

     Harassment can include, but is not limited to the following actions:

    •  Inappropriate Communication – involves any language that is offensive, unnecessarily loud or that degrades or berates others, including, but not        limited to, racial, religious, or sexual comments or jokes, sexual innuendos, or threats of any kind, whether communicated verbally, in writing, or electronically.
    • Physical Abuse – includes, but is not limited to, touching, hitting, kicking, or threatening another person, including restraining by force or blocking the path of another.  
    • Interference or Hostile Environment – includes any behavior or action that interferes with a student or employee’s ability to perform job duties and responsibilities, or participate in the education process, or which results in or creates a hostile or intimidating environment.
    • Sexual Harassment – includes, but is not limited to, unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual acts or favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when:

                         ·      Submission to such conduct is made, either explicitly or implicitly, a term or condition of an individual’s employment or                continuation of education;

                         ·       Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for employment or educational decisions affecting such individual; or

                         ·       Such conduct is severe and pervasive and has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with the individual’s work or school performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment.

     

    • Retaliation - – includes any adverse action or threat of adverse action taken or made because a student or employee has exercised or attempted to exercise any rights under applicable laws or under policies of the company. Retaliation includes, but is not limited to, threats, or withholding or withdrawal of pay, promotions, training, grades or employment opportunities.

     It is important that students and employees clearly understand the serious effects of harassment. Such behavior may result in personal liability, as well as a liability to the school.

     If an individual feels that he/she has been subjected to any type of degree of harassment, he/she must report the incident verbally or in writing to the Executive Director or Director of Education, immediate supervisor, department head, and any other member of management, the Chief Executive Officer or the Human Resources department. A complaint must include the specific nature of the incident and the date(s) and place(s) such alleged harassment took place, as well as the name(s) of any individual(s) known to be involved, but does not have to be in writing.

     When the school’s management becomes aware that harassment might exist, it is obligated by law to take prompt and appropriate action, whether or not the victim wants the school to do so. Complaints of violations will be promptly and carefully investigated, including interviews with all relevant persons. Investigators will conduct an objective investigation with consideration given to each person’s desire for privacy; however, no student or employee is guaranteed complete confidentiality and/or anonymity during an investigation. Only individuals with a legitimate “need to know” will be given any information regarding the complaint(s).   

     Employees and students who utilize this procedure are assured that they will be free from any reprisal or retaliation for reporting such violations or cooperating in an investigation.

     Any student found to have harassed a fellow student or school staff member would be subject to severe disciplinary action, including possible expulsion from school. In addition, any staff member found to have harassed a student or other staff member would be subject to severe disciplinary action including possible discharge from employment. The school will take necessary action to remedy the situation appropriately. However, if an investigation of a complaint shows that the complaint or information was knowingly false, the individual who provided the false information will be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal from the school or, if a staff member up to and including termination from employment.

     

     

     

     

    Title IX Compliance

    Ancora Education's Title IX coordinator is responsible for each school's overall compliance with Title IX, including response to reports of sexual misconduct affecting the campus community, as set forth in further detail in Ancora's Title IX Compliance Policy. Questions regarding the application of Title IX and the schools’ compliance with it should be directed to the Title IX coordinator, whose contact information is available below. Students who wish to make a report of sexual misconduct affecting the campus community should follow the grievance procedure published in the catalog.

    Donna R. Gilley
    Ancora Education
    (682) 334-5620
    dgilley@ancoraeducation.com
     

    Academic Integrity and Copyright Infringement Policy

    Students are expected to maintain the highest standards of academic conduct by always submitting their own original work for all assignments, research papers, tests, and projects. Students found to engage in plagiarism, cheating, or other forms of academic dishonesty will be subject to negative consequences up to, and including termination from School.

    Plagiarism is the use of another’s words or ideas without proper citation, and includes copying large sections of text or images from print or electronic resources, or another student’s work. Students may avoid plagiarism by forming ideas in their own words, quoting only limited passages of borrowed text, and always acknowledging the origin of borrowed ideas or words with a correct citation.

    Members of the The Creative Circus community are expected to follow copyright law, Title 17 of the United States Code, while fulfilling the core mission of teaching, research, and extending knowledge and creativity in all areas. The provisions in the copyright law allow an author, artist, composer or other creator of a work to control the use of his or her work by others, with important exceptions. Copyright protections and the accompanying exceptions extend to print and digital formats of literary works, computer software, musical works, unpublished materials such as manuscripts, dramatic works, pantomimes and choreographic works, pictorial and graphic works, sculpture, motion pictures and other audiovisual works, sound recordings, and architectural works. Failure to observe copyright or license agreements Unauthorized distribution of copyrighted material and unauthorized peer-to-peer sharing using the institution’s information technology system may result in disciplinary action, including dismissal from the school, legal action by the copyright owner, and/or criminal penalties.

    Since the files distributed over peer-to-peer networks are primarily copyrighted works, there is a risk of liability for downloading material from these networks. To avoid these risks, there are currently many "authorized" services on the Internet that allow consumers to purchase copyrighted works online, whether music, ebooks, or motion pictures. By purchasing works through authorized services, consumers can avoid the risks of infringement liability and can limit their exposure to other potential risks, e.g., viruses, unexpected material, or spyware.  Other legal alternatives for downloading or otherwise acquiring copyrighted material include utilizing the school’s library facilities or public lending libraries.

    Questions concerning this institution’s copyright policy should be directed to Centralized Library Services.

    Summary of Civil and Criminal Penalties for Violation of Federal Copyright Laws 
    Penalties for copyright infringement include civil and criminal penalties. In general, anyone found liable for civil copyright infringement may be ordered to pay either actual damages or “statutory” damages affixed at not less than $750 and not more than $30,000 per work infringed. For “willful” infringement, a court may award up to $150,000 per work infringed. A court can, in its discretion, also assess costs and attorneys’ fees. For details, see Title 17, United States Code, Sections 504, 505.

    Willful copyright infringement can also result in criminal penalties, including imprisonment of up to five years and fines of up to $250,000 per offense. For more information, please see the website of the U.S. Copyright Office at 
    www.copyright.gov.

    Copy equipment at the school may not be used to copy copyrighted material. In addition, none of the material listed below may be copied by students or employees. Copyrightable works include the following categories: 

    1. Literary works, including computer software
    2. Musical works, including any accompanying words
    3. Dramatic works, including any accompanying music
    4. Pantomimes and choreographic work
    5. Pictorial, graphic, and sculptured works
    6. Motion pictures and other audiovisual works
    7. Sound recordings
    8. Architectural works 

    These categories should be viewed broadly. For example, computer programs and most “compilations” may be registered as “literary works;” maps and architectural plans may be registered as “pictorial, graphic, and sculptured works.”

     

    Computer Use and File Sharing

    The Creative Circus computer systems and networks are provided for student use as a part of school's academic programs. Students are not permitted to use their personal devices on the school's computer network.  This poses a security risk to the school's infrastructure and is prohibited.  All students have a responsibility to use The Creative Circuscomputer systems and networks in an ethical and lawful manner. Students found to have misused computer systems and networks may receive disciplinary action up to and including dismissal. The Creative Circus will not tolerate any abuse of computer systems and networks. This is not an all-inclusive list. In the case of a dismissal, the student will be subject to the refund policy as outlined in the school catalog.

    Examples of behaviors considered to be in violation of the school's policy on student computer systems and network include:

    • Sending obscene, harassing, intimidating and/or threatening messages through email or other means. Viewing or downloading, displaying, printing or otherwise disseminating material that is sexually explicit, profane, obscene, harassing, fraudulent, racially offensive, defamatory or otherwise unlawful.

    • Downloading any software programs, files or other items including but not limited to internet accelerator programs, search engines, upgrades, enhancements, fonts, graphic images, photos or other items unless authorized to do so by the Director of Education or Executive Director. Transferring personal software to The Creative Circus computers is prohibited.

    • Soliciting business, selling products, or otherwise engaging in commercial activities or personal advertisements. Using The Creative Circus computer and/or network to perpetrate fraud, misrepresentation or illegal activity. 

    • Providing others with access to one’s personal computer accounts or attempting to gain access to the computer accounts, files or system to which authorized access has not been granted.

    • Attempting to circumvent or compromise The Creative Circus computer security or the security of any remote system accessed through South The Creative Circus equipment or networks.

    • Creating or releasing computer viruses or engaging in other destructive or potentially destructive programming activities.

    • Modifying, altering, or tampering with systems hardware or software unless explicitly authorized to do so by the Executive Director.

     

    Sexual Harassment

    Sexual Harassment / Title IX Compliance Policy
    The school is committed to providing a school environment that ensures the equality, dignity, and respect of every student. In keeping with this commitment, the school strictly prohibits discriminatory practices, including sexual harassment, and will not deny or limit the ability of any student to participate in, or benefit from, any school program on the basis of sex. Sexual harassment, whether verbal, physical or environmental, is unacceptable and will not be tolerated, whether it occurs on school grounds or at outside school‐sponsored activities. This policy applies to all school employees and students. All employees have a duty to ensure that no student is subjected to sexual harassment and to help maintain a school environment free of such harassment.

    Ancora Education's Title IX coordinator is responsible for each school's overall compliance with Title IX, including response to reports of sexual misconduct affecting the campus community, as set forth in further detail in Ancora's Title IX Compliance Policy. For questions regarding Title IX procedures and how the schools complies with Title IX please see the Ancora Education Consumer Information and Annual Security Report, which is located at: 

    https://creativecircus.edu/consumer-information/
      
    Please direct any additional questions to the Title IX coordinator, whose contact information is available below.


    Donna R. Gilley
    Ancora Education
    (682) 334-5620
    dgilley@ancoraeducation.com

     

    Attendance Policy

    The student is responsible for initiating any request to make up work missed because of class absence (see Make-Up Policy). Makeup of missed classes does not remove an absence from a student’s record. If a student is absent from all classes for 14 or more consecutive calendar days, the student may be withdrawn from school.


    Clock hour programs:
    Programs that are considered clock hour programs for Title IV purposes, and are identified as such in this catalog, may have specific attendance requirements. Students are expected to attend all courses and to be in class at the appropriate times. The licensing boards that govern some of these programs may require that all missed class time be made up and may impose limits on the number of hours that may be missed and subsequently made up. Make up hours are scheduled by the instructor and attendance is monitored and recorded. Any make up hours allowed must be completed prior to the end of the term in which the course is taken. The instructor of each course will notify students of the specific attendance policy at the beginning of the course. Students who miss class sessions in clock hour programs may experience a delay in the disbursement of their aid, as disbursements are based on the students’ successful completion of courses, which is impacted by attendance.

    To remain eligible for Title IV funding and to progress to the next course a student in a clock hour program must meet a 90% attendance threshold per course.

    Ground courses: Attendance for ground courses is taken in the physical classroom by the instructor. Students who fail to attend the physical class sessions for 14 or more consecutive calendar days may be withdrawn. Regardless of the situation resulting in an absence from class, students are expected to be in attendance a minimum 60% per grading period to pass a course.  Any attendance below 60% may result in the student failing the course. 

    Online courses: Attendance for online courses is taken by students logging in and completing work in the online classroom. Students are expected to actively participate in their online courses at least twice per week. Students who do not submit substantive work for their online courses for 14 or more consecutive calendar days may be withdrawn.  Regular Attendance in an Online Class is an important contributor to student success in online courses. To comply with federal mandates for school’s handling of student aid, certain kinds of student activity may or may not count as participation sufficient to qualify as attendance in online courses.

    For attendance to be earned, the student must complete at least one of the following academic events (1) complete a quiz, (2) complete and post an assignment, or (3) post at least once a week to a relevant class discussion board.

    Hybrid courses: Attendance for hybrid courses is taken both in the physical classroom and by students logging in and completing work in the online classroom. Students are expected to attend both the physical class sessions and actively participate in their online classes. Students who fail to either attend the physical class or post attendance by completing substantive work in the online classroom for 14 or more consecutive calendar days may be withdrawn.  Regardless of the situation resulting in an absence from class students are expected to be in attendance a minimum 60% per grading period to pass a course.  Any attendance below 60% may result in the student failing the course.

    Some programmatically accredited programs or programs that require licensure may have additional attendance requirements. These requirements are outlined under State/Programmatic-Mandated Policies. Where the state attendance and makeup work policy differs from the institutional policy, the stricter policy applies.

     

    Incomplete Policy

    The grade of Incomplete (I) is given for a valid reason when a student is unable to complete all the work in the course by the time the course ends. An Incomplete Grade Request Form must be submitted to the Director of Education, or designee, prior to the last day of the course. Students must initiate arrangements with instructors and receive approval of the Director of Education, or designee, to make up the required work within 14 calendar days after the end of the course. At that time, the grade will be calculated based on the work submitted and will replace the Incomplete. Incomplete grades count as credits/hours attempted but not completed. When the Incomplete is converted to a letter grade, it will be computed as credits/hours completed or failed, depending on the grade assigned.

    Procedure:

    • The student must request the Incomplete prior to the last day of the course using the Incomplete Grade Request;
      •  In order to approve an Incomplete, the student must have earned a minimum of a 25% in the course.
      • The Director of Education, or designee, may approve students under an earned 25% with mitigating circumstances.    
        • Additional documentation may be required to approve exceptions.
    • If approved, The Director of Education, or designee, will notify the student prior to an “I” grade being entered in the Student Information System;
    • Student must make up all Incomplete grades within 14 days of the end of the course;
      •  All hours completed with a qualified instructor on campus to assist with makeup work will count toward the student’s attendance hours and is documented with an AD – Attendance Change Form;
    • Grade will be converted to “F” or the grade the student has earned at the end of the incomplete period approved unless special approval is given to extend the deadline;
    • Appropriate supporting documentation for the grade will be uploaded into Image Now along with the approved Incomplete Grade Request once the “I” grade is resolved;
    • Students who are approved for an “I” grade in their final course may be withdrawn until the “I” is resolved if the approval extends beyond the Drop/Add period and the student isn’t enrolled in any other courses;
      • In these cases, the student must be dropped, finish hours, reinstated, grades and hours finalized, then approved to graduate.
    • Students may request a late incomplete after the course has closed through the Director of Education, Student Services Coordinator; Student Resource Coordinator, or Hybrid Teaching Assistant (SSC/SRC/HTA).
      • Late incomplete requests must be submitted in writing within 7 calendar days of the end of the course and will be approved only based on mitigating circumstances.
      • Late incompletes beyond a week may only be granted by the VP of Academics or the AVP Online Academic Operations in cases where the campus fails to provide the student with reasonable access to complete coursework.
     

    Late Work Submission/Make-up Policy

    The campus recognizes that there are circumstances and events which require students to miss classes, resulting in the need for makeup work. Because Ancora Education believes the purpose of completing work is to help the student learn and be successful, instructors are expected to work with students on the submission of makeup work. Students must initiate contact with the instructor to discuss the makeup work in question. The student will work with the instructor on new deadlines and any deductions that may result based on the late work, not to exceed 20% per assignment. Examinations may be made up only with documented extenuating circumstances. The deadline must be prior to the end of the term, or else the student must apply for an Incomplete (see the Incomplete policy). Online modality assessments are considered normal makeup work, not examinations for purposes of this policy.   The procedure for requesting the opportunity to makeup required work can be obtained from the instructor. *Students will not be charged for completing makeup work.
     

    Leave of Absence

    An approved Leave of Absence (LOA) is a temporary interruption in a student’s academic attendance for a specific period of time in an ongoing program.

    Leave of Absence Conditions

    The following conditions may be considered: 

    • Medical Leave (including pregnancy)
    • Family Care (unexpected childcare issues or medical care of family)
    • Military Duty
    • Jury Duty

    The following requirements apply:

    A student may be granted a Leave of Absence (LOA) if: 

    • A LOA request is submitted in writing within 14 calendar days of the student’s last date of attendance, which includes the reason for the request.  If unforeseen circumstances prevent the student from providing a written request within 14 calendar days the campus may use its discretion to grant the student’s request if the student provides the written documentation validating the unforeseen circumstances  by the last day of the campus’s attendance policy.
    • Generally, only one leave of absence may be granted to a student in a 12-month period. However, more than one leave of absence may be granted for limited, well documented cases due to unforeseen circumstances that are listed below, provided that the total number of days the student remains on LOA may not exceed 180 days during a consecutive 12-month time frame. Reasons for potential second leaves of absence include:
      • One additional leave of absence, if it does not exceed 30 days and the campus determines that it is necessary due to unforeseen circumstances; this type of leave of absence would have to be subsequent to the granting of the single leave of absence, which is granted at the campus's discretion.  This may not be possible in all programs based on term structure.
      • Subsequent leaves of absence if the campus documents that they are granted for jury duty, military reasons, or circumstances covered under the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA) (Public Law 103-3), enacted February 5, 1993. The circumstances that are covered under the FMLA, as applied to students, are:
        • Birth of a son or daughter of the student and the need to care for that son or daughter (within 12 months of the date of birth)
        • Placement of a son or daughter with the student for adoption or foster care (within 12 months beginning on the date of the placement)
        • Need to care for the student’s spouse, or a son, daughter, or parent, if the spouse son, daughter, or parent has a serious health condition
        • A serious health condition that makes the student unable to function as a student
    • There may be limitations on LOA eligibility for students enrolled in term-based programs due to scheduling requirements.  This is due to the requirement that a student must return into the same classes when coming off of an LOA.
    • The total days considered on LOA will include days up to the point in the coursework where the student left on LOA.  It is strongly advised that the student return at the beginning of the term when possible in order to benefit from a review of the material.  Any resubmitted work the student completes will be graded, and the higher of the two grades will be counted.
    • The student must have earned a successful grade in at least one course before being eligible to apply for an LOA
    • A student may not apply for an LOA between terms, they are only eligible if they start an LOA during a term.

    Failure to return from an approved leave of absence will result in withdrawal from the campus, may have an impact on aid, loan repayment and exhaustion of the loan grace period for the total days the student was on the LOA. Students in a LOA status may not receive further financial aid disbursements until returning to active status.  Contact the financial aid office for more information about the impact of a LOA on financial aid.

     

    Withdrawal

    Students desiring to withdraw from the school or an individual course should contact the Director of Education or Registrar to obtain the necessary forms and procedures for official withdrawal. Students who withdraw from all courses within the drop/add period will receive a grade of “W*”.  Students who withdraw from one or more courses during drop/add but maintain enrollment in at least one or more course will be unregistered from the courses being dropped. Students withdrawing after the drop/add period and prior to the last day to withdrawal will receive a “W.” Students withdrawing from one or more classes after the last day to withdrawal will receive the grade earned in the class. “Ws” are not computed in the student’s GPA. Students who receive Federal Student Loans must schedule an exit interview with a Financial Services Officer before they leave school, either by graduation or withdrawal. Students who are unable to finish a term due to deployment for active duty military service, whether enlisted, reserve, or National Guard will find the policy regarding military withdrawals in the "Withdrawal due to Military Deployment" section of this catalog.

    Last Day to Withdraw:  
    A student is awarded a grade of W (Withdrawal) when withdrawing from a course or all courses prior to the last day to withdraw for a term or grading period, except in the case of foundations courses where the student is awarded a grade of W*.  The last day to withdraw for a standard quarter is the last day of the ninth week of the quarter.
     

    Withdrawal Due to Military Leave or National Emergency

    Students who are unable to finish a term due to military leave or declared national emergency, are entitled to a refund of all tuition and fees for the unfinished term. Credit will not be granted for unfinished courses, and the unfinished courses will not impact the student’s Satisfactory Academic Progress. If the student is deployed or impacted by a national emergency at the end of a term and completes his or her courses, then the tuition will not be refunded, the credits will be earned, and the student’s Satisfactory Academic Progress will reflect the inclusion of those credits. Such a student will be released from any financial obligations for future terms. Students who choose to return to school can reapply as returning students. Affected students should confirm in writing their request to be removed from grading period and provide supporting evidence, such as a copy of official orders, and/or a letter from a superior, to document the activation and/or deployment.  Students are also encouraged to consider taking courses online whenever possible during deployments, so that they can continue to progress toward completion of their programs.

    Affected individuals include the following, as well as their spouses and dependents: 
    • Active duty military personnel serving during a war, military operation or national emergency.
    • Members of the National Guard performing a qualifying duty (i.e., called to active service by the President or Secretary of Defense for a period of more than 30 consecutive days) during a war, military operation or national emergency.
    • People who reside or are employed in an area declared a disaster area by any Federal, State or local official in connection with a national emergency.
    • People who suffer economic hardship as a result of a war, military operation, or national emergency.
     

    Re-Admission

    Students who have withdrawn from The Creative Circus and wish to be readmitted should contact the school. If the application for re-admission is for a different curriculum, the standard requirements for a change of program will apply. All applicants for re-admission will be required to complete the Smarter Measures Assessment the first time they re-enroll, unless taken during their previous enrollment. The assessment measures student readiness to return to school and engage in post-secondary learning based on non-cognitive indicators of success. The school uses the results of the assessment to determine the type of support that will be most beneficial to the student through the program of study.

    Approval for readmission for the same curriculum or an alternate selection will be based on the applicant's ability and aptitude, the time elapsed since withdrawing, recommendations of the instructors of the program to which the applicant is reapplying, and the applicant's career objectives. Prior tuition balances and student loan statuses must be clear before readmission application forms will be processed. Re-entering students must meet all admission requirements in place at the time of their re-entry. Applicants granted re-admission may have course load restrictions, specific grade and attendance requirements, and/or required advisement sessions in order to remain enrolled at The Creative Circus.

     

    Loss of Personal Property

    The school does not assume responsibility for the loss of books or other personal property. However, all instructors and students are requested to give the Receptionist/Security Desk all articles found so that the owner may claim them.
     

    Administrative Prerogatives

    The school reserves the right, at any time, to make changes as it deems necessary or desirable in its policies and operating procedures, to modify its tuition rates, to add to or withdraw members from its faculty and staff, to rearrange its courses and programs as teaching policies render it desirable, and to withdraw or re-sequence subjects, courses, and programs if registration falls below the required number.
     

    Grievance Resolution

    The Creative Circus’s stated objective is the preparation of its graduates for a career in their chosen field of training. If a student has a grievance, the following procedure must be followed. It is The Creative Circus’s desire that a grievance be settled at the lowest possible level, and resolved as rapidly as possible. 

    1. A student will attempt to resolve a grievance with the person involved.
    2. If a student is unable to resolve the grievance with the person involved, it should be submitted in writing to that person’s supervisor.
    3. If the grievance is still unresolved after two days, the student should submit a written summary to the Executive Director. A meeting will be set up to include the student, person involved, and the Director. Every effort will be made to resolve the grievance at this point.
    4. If the student notifies the Executive Director in writing that the student does not consider the grievance to be resolved, a written summary by the Executive Director, along with all other materials, will be forwarded to:

      Ombudsman Department
      STVT-AAI Education Inc.
      8701 Bedford Euless Rd., Suite 400
      Hurst, Texas 76053
      complaints@ancoraeducation.com

    A written decision on the grievance report will be sent to the student and the School Director within five working days after receipt of the signed grievance.

    Grievances may also be directed to the Georgia Non-public Postsecondary Education Commission:

    Georgia Non-public Postsecondary Education Commission
    2082 East Exchange Place, Suite 220
    Tucker, Georgia 30084-5305
    (770)414-3300
    www.gnpec.org


    Students also have a right to appeal an institution's decision to the Georgia Non-public Postsecondary Education Commission.
     
    Students may also contact the U. S. Department of Education Ombudsman Group; this office will receive, review and attempt to resolve disputes from students regarding Federal Student Aid complaints. The Ombudsman Group may be reached at:

    U. S. Department of Education
    FSA Ombudsman Group
    830 First Street, N.E.
    Fourth Floor
    Washington, DC 20202-5144
    Phone: 877.557.2575  Fax: 202.275.0549
    http://studentaid.ed.gov/repay-loans/disputes/prepare

     

    Statement of Non-Retaliation

    In many instances, Ancora Education must rely on individual faculty, staff, and students to report to the appropriate office cases where it appears that a member or members of the community are not complying with applicable law or policy. A major deterrent to such reporting is the fear that the person or persons against whom the report is made will retaliate against the person making the report. The purpose of this policy is to clearly articulate that Ancora Education prohibits retaliation against those who make reports of possible non-compliance and good-faith grievances raised by students.

    Faculty, administrators, and staff shall not intimidate or take retaliatory action, as defined below, against any member of the community, who makes a report of the type defined below in good faith and without malice.

    This Policy also prohibits persons from knowingly and intentionally making a report of non-compliance or grievance that is knowingly false.

    The prohibition against retaliation applies to:  

    1. The disclosure of information concerning conduct that the reporter believes is illegal or in violation of campus policies;
    2. Disclosures made during compliance review or a peer review process;
    3. The filing of a legitimate complaint, grievance, or incident report

     The types of retaliation that are prohibited include but are not limited to:  

    1. Intimidation;
    2. Adverse actions with respect to the reporter's work assignments, salary, vacation, and other terms of employment;
    3. Unlawful discrimination;
    4. Termination of employment;
    5. Adverse actions against a relative of the reporter who is a Ancora Education employee or student at an institution owned and operated by Ancora Education; and
    6. Threats of any of the above   

    Note that an adverse personnel, academic or other disciplinary action against an employee or student whose conduct or performance warrants such action for reasons unrelated to the reporting of a concern will not be deemed a violation of this policy.

    Individuals who violate this policy shall be subject to appropriate disciplinary proceedings as set forth in the catalog, and, if found to have violated the policy, they may be subjected to the full range of available sanctions, up to and including termination of employment or dismissal from an academic program.

     

    Care of Facilities

    Smoking, eating, and drinking are prohibited in the classrooms and the hallways of The Creative Circus. The school has provided a student lounge for eating and drinking and an outside area for smoking.  The Creative Circus maintains a smoke-free environment.
     

    Student Consumer Information

    Students should contact the following staff members for the information listed below:

    1. Director of Admissions:  Admission requirements and procedures, cost of attendance, including tuition, fees, books, transportation, housing, and refund policy.
    2. Director of Education:  Description of academic programs, facilities, and faculty; data on student retention, numbers and percentages of students completing programs, academic standards of progress, transfer credits from other institutions, and students with disabilities.
    3. Director of Student Placement:  Assistance with securing employment upon graduation including preparation of resumes, completion of application materials, and preparation for interviews; assistance with locating part-time employment while in school; information on graduate placement, and employment demographics of the region.
    4. Financial Aid Director:  Description of financial assistance programs, rights and responsibilities of financial aid recipients, means and frequency of payments, financial aid awards, terms and schedules of student loan repayment, and general terms and conditions of employment provided as financial aid.
    5. Campus Director:  Information regarding the overall operation of the campusThe Campus Director is the Chief Operating Officer and principal administrator for the school.



     

    Permanent Closure

     If the Board of Directors of the school decides to close the school, currently enrolled students in good standing and who remain in good standing will be allowed to complete their program of study. New students will not be admitted or former students readmitted. Currently enrolled students in good standing may be transferred to comparable institutions.
     

    Academic Resources, Policies, & Procedures

     

    Student Classification

    a. Full-time Student - For credit hour programs, a full-time student is a student scheduled for 12 or more credit hours per term.

    b. Three-quarter time Student - A three-quarter time student is a student scheduled for at least 9 but less than 12 credit hours per term.

    c. Half-time Student - A half-time student is a student scheduled for at least 6 but less than 9 credit hours per term.

    d. Regular Student - A regular student is an admitted student who is enrolled in a diploma or certificate program in good academic standing.

    e. Non-Matriculating Students – Non-matriculating students are those who seek admission for course credit in order to meet specific educational needs but do not wish to take the entire required curriculum leading to an academic credential. The non-matriculating student is required to submit an application as such and is not eligible for federal or state aid.

    f. Auditing Students – In some instances a student may be allowed to audit a previously passed course in his/her program for the purpose of improving skills or knowledge base. Audited courses are assigned a grade of AU and do not count as credits attempted or earned for any purposes and do not have any effect on calculations of pace or GPA.

     

    Definition of a Credit Hour

    The Creative Circus awards quarter credit hours for all programs.

    A credit hour is defined as an amount of work represented by intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than (1) one hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work for ten to twelve weeks for one quarter hour of credit, or the equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time; or (2) at least an equivalent amount of work as required in paragraph (1) of this definition for other academic activities as established by the institution including laboratory work, internships, practica, and other academic work leading to the award of credit hours.

    Credit in traditionally delivered programs is measured in credit hours and is calculated based upon the following attribution formula:

    One quarter credit hour equals, at a minimum, 10 classroom hours of lecture, 20 hours of laboratory, and 30 hours of externship. A class hour is an instructional period of fifty (50) minutes of instruction in a sixty (60) minute period. For Title IV purposes, the school uses the classroom hours of instruction plus out-of-class hours (Study/Prep/Review) identified for the course(s).

    The syllabus for each course describes both the hours of classroom instruction as well as the out-of-class learning activities required to support the academic credit awarded for the course. Many courses are a combination of lecture, lab, and practicum.
     

    Definition of a Clock Hour

    A clock hour is defined as fifty minutes of instruction within a sixty-minute period.
     

    Admission to Classes

    Students are admitted to classes only with official written authorization (i.e., schedules, class change notifications, and attendance change notifications). No visitors (including relatives, spouses, children, friends, and pets) are permitted in classes at any time without prior permission of the instructor or administration. Students are expected to attend all classes beginning with the first class session. To remain officially enrolled in a class, a student must attend at least once prior to the conclusion of the drop/add period.
     

    Registration

    All students are expected to register during the time scheduled for that purpose. Quarterly registration dates are published and announced. The school reserves the right to schedule courses that are deemed appropriate for the best educational sequence for the student and the school. Course schedules and course loads should be carefully planned by the student in consultation with his/her Program Director or the Director of Education. Each student is responsible for being familiar with the requirements of his/her program of study and for keeping account of progress toward completion of graduation requirements. The student is expected to be familiar with the regulations set forth in the catalog.  An electronic copy of the catalog is available on the school website. A student who desires to register for course work above the normal course load outlined for the curriculum must obtain written permission from his/her Program Director who must receive final approval from the Director of Education.

     

    Schedule Changes and Drop/Add Period

    Term-based Programs (comprised of 11-week classes in a term)

    The equivalent of the first five school days of each term are designated as the “drop/add period” for schedule changes involving individual courses for students who start at the beginning of the term. By the end of the drop/add period, each student’s schedule must be in place for the remainder of the term. Individual courses dropped during drop/add will not appear on a student’s transcript and no tuition will be charged for those courses.
     

    Grading System

    Grade

    Definition

    Quality Points

    A

    90-100 Excellent

    4

    B

    80-89 Above Average

    3

    C

    70-79 Average

    2

    D

     60-69 Below Average

    1

    F

    0-59 Failing

    0

    W

    Withdrawal   

    Not calculated

    W*

    Withdrawal excluded from SAP

    Not calculated

    S

    Satisfactory (70% or higher)

    Not calculated

    U

    Unsatisfactory (Below 70%)

    Not calculated

    I

    Incomplete

    Not calculated 

    TO

    Passed by examination

    Not calculated

    T

    Credit by Transfer
    (before February 2011)

    Not calculated

    T1

     Credit By Transfer
    (as of February 2011)

    Not calculated

    P

    Pass (60% or higher)

    Not calculated

    NP

    No Pass (Below 60%)

    0

    NA

    Never Attended

    Not calculated

    AU

    Audit

    Not calculated

    Grade Measurement
    Grades measure the degree to which a student masters the competencies in program coursework and are one measure of a student's ability to meet employment standards in the field for which the student is preparing. Upon the completion of each term, the student is given a letter grade in each course based upon written examinations, practical exercises, projects and other submitted work, as defined in the course syllabus. Reports showing the final grade in each course, the term summary and CGPAs are furnished to each student at the end of each term. Every course for which a student officially registers will appear on the student's official transcript unless the student cancels his/her enrollment prior to the commencement of classes or drops an individual course prior to the end of the drop/add period. All courses entered on a student's official transcript are assigned a letter grade.

     

    Extra Credit Policy

    Each course within a program of study is thoughtfully designed to build upon prior knowledge, introduce new concepts, provide supportive resources, allow the student to validate and remediate personal mastery of the content, and to assess student development of a defined set of competencies and the achievement of a prescribed list of learning objectives. Each activity, assignment and/or assessment associated with a course is carefully constructed to support the development of one or more course learning objectives and one or more competencies. Therefore, the institution does not provide opportunities to earn “extra credit.”
     

    Grade Reports

    Reports showing the final grade earned in each course and grade point averages are issued to students upon completion of each term. Students demonstrating unsatisfactory work at mid-term are notified by instructors through mid-term reports. Students are encouraged to discuss their progress with their instructors throughout each term. Students with questions about a grade should contact the instructor immediately upon receiving the grade.
     

    Grade Change Policy

    Students wishing to contest a grade for a valid reason must do so by the end of the Drop/Add period immediately following the term in which the original grade was earned. A Grade Change Request Form must be submitted to the Director of Education prior to the last day Drop/Add of the immediately following term. The Director of Education will investigate the original grade based on the information provided by the student. The grade change must be resolved within 30 days of the request being made.
     

    Graduation Requirements

    To graduate from any program, a student must:
    • Complete an industry-ready portfolio as evaluated by the Graduation Committee
    • Maintain a minimum CGPA of 2.0 while enrolled
    • Satisfactorily complete all current curriculum requirements or their equivalent
    • Fulfill all financial obligations to the institution
    • Complete minimum clock hour/credit hour requirements after consideration of transfer credits or advanced placement.

    The Graduation Committee is comprised of the student’s department head, the Executive Creative Director, the Career Services Director and a representative of the industry. This committee will review and evaluate the portfolios of all prospective graduates. The portfolio review is part of each programs graduate portfolio review course.

    Student who do not meet the requirements have two options to complete their portfolio for a re-review by the Graduation Committee:

    1. Status is changed to Drop and there is a specified time given to the student to complete their portfolio and re-submit to the Graduation Committee for review.
    2. Student enrolls in a 9th quarter to complete his or her portfolio. At the end of this quarter the student’s portfolios are resubmitted to the Graduation Committee for review.

    Once the portfolio is deemed industry –ready by the Graduation Committee and approved, and assuming all other graduation requirements have been met, the student’s status is changed to Graduate.

     

    Early Graduation Policy

    Occasionally, students become employed in their field of study prior to their scheduled graduation date and therefore do not fulfill all Creative Circus graduation requirements. Students who secure verifiable employment in the industry prior to graduation may be eligible for Non-Graduate Completer status at the Circus. Students who wish to apply for Non-Graduate Completer status at the Circus must have completed their sixth quarter and/or at least 75% of total program credit hours. Students must submit the Early Grad/Exempt from Grad Class form to the Director of Education and the request will be reviewed by the Program Director. If approved by the program director, the Campus Director and the Director of Education will ultimately determine whether the change of status is approved. If approval is granted, the student will receive a Certificate of Completion dated the graduation date of the quarter in which the request was made. If the student wishes to participate in the graduation ceremonies, he/she will have the opportunity to participate in the quarter following the approval. If approval is denied, the student will remain in a drop status.
     

    Graduation Ceremony

    In an effort to recognize and commend students for achievements and completion of program requirements, graduation ceremonies are held quarterly for successful candidates. Students are presented with certificates at this time and given the opportunity to present some of their work to their family and friends.
     

    Special Programs

    Single courses or combinations of single courses are available to prospective students in either day or evening classes. Charges for these courses may vary based on the number and type of courses taken.
     

    Transcripts

    A complete record of every course for which a student registers is maintained in an electronic student records system.  The record of all credits attempted and earned is posted to this form concurrent with the issuance of term grade reports to students.  A record that has been delivered electronically through the secure transcript request website or is printed, sealed and dated constitutes an Official Transcript.  One “Issued to Student” Transcript will be provided at no charge to the student upon request.  Official Transcripts provided to any institution or agency designated by the student will incur a charge of $10.00 each.  Students who have not satisfied their financial obligations to the school are not eligible to receive transcripts.  Written authorization by the student is required for the school to release a Transcript to a third party.

    Transcripts may be requested at www.parchment.com
     

    Satisfactory Academic Progress

    Satisfactory Academic Progress

    A student must meet the following standards of academic achievement and successful course completion while enrolled. Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) applies to all students including full or part time status, and all periods of an active regular enrollment regardless of whether or not the student receives financial aid. Student enrollment status is determined at the end of the drop/add for any given term or payment period (determined by program, defined herein as “academic term”). All courses in a program must be successfully completed in order for a student to graduate from the program. Permanent records are maintained for every student indicating courses completed and grades earned. Students must be considered to be in good standing, either as a result of having met SAP, having an approved appeal on file, or having met the terms of a given academic plan, in order to maintain enrollment in a subsequent scheduled academic term. SAP does not apply to students enrolled in professional development/continuing education courses, which are courses not included within the scope of the institution's accreditation and are not eligible for Title IV funding.

    The following SAP standards are for Credit Hour Programs:

    Evaluation Points: All SAP evaluations for Credit Hour Programs occur at the end of an academic term and are cumulative in nature. All students re-entering after a period of non-attendance will have their most recent SAP status reviewed to determine eligibility to return. Re-entries will then be evaluated for SAP in their new enrollment at the end of the academic term. SAP is determined by measuring the student’s cumulative grade point average (CGPA) and the student’s pace toward completion of course credit hours attempted in the academic program. The calculated CGPA and pace are compared against thresholds (see table below) to determine whether or not the student meets SAP (at or above threshold).

    For credit hour programs, credits attempted are those credits for which the student is enrolled at the end of the drop/add of an academic term. Credits earned are credits for which the student receives a passing grade at the end of the academic term.

    Satisfactory Progress Thresholds for Credit Hour Programs:

    Programs greater than 80 Credit Hours

     

    Programs with 60-80 Credit Hours

    Credit Hours Attempted

    CGPA

    Minimum Pace

     

    Credit Hours  Attempted

    CGPA

    MinimumPace

    0-36

    1.5

    50%

     

    0 -24

    1.5

    50%

    37-64

    1.75

    60%

     

    25 - 36

    1.75

    60%

    65+

    2.0

    66.67%

     

    37+

    2.0

    66.67%


    Programs less than 60 Credit Hours

    CGPA

    Minimum Pace

    2.0

    66.67%


    At the end of any SAP Evaluation period, if a student’s CGPA or Pace is below the stated threshold, the student’s academic progress is considered unsatisfactory.

    Maximum Timeframe/Maximum Program Length

    A student must complete an academic program in no more than one and one half (1.5) times the published normal program length. To determine the maximum timeframe for programs measured in credit hours, take the published number of credit hours necessary to graduate and multiply by 1.5.

    Example:

    92 Published Program Credits x 1.5 Maximum Timeframe = 138 Maximum Attempted Credits Permitted to Complete Program

    If, at any time, it is determined to be mathematically impossible for a student to complete the program of study within the Maximum Timeframe, the student WILL be ineligible for additional Title IV funding and dismissed from the program of study.

    Students may appeal dismissal for extenuating circumstances and must meet with the Director of Education for the appeal process. If approved, the student will be placed on extended enrollment and the student's cGPA will continue to update based on the Repeated Courses policy where the highest grade will be applied in each repeated course. However, the student will be assessed no further charges and remain ineligible to receive financial aid.

    Please see each course outline in this catalog for a program level explanation of what qualifies as maximum timeframe.

    Unsatisfactory Academic Progress

    Students not meeting SAP are subject to dismissal from their programs of study and are ineligible to receive financial aid, except under certain circumstances.

    Financial Aid Warning for Credit Hour Programs

    If a student’s progress in a credit hour program, measured at the end of an academic term is determined to be unsatisfactory, the school may place the student on Financial Aid Warning status for one academic term. The student will be advised of the performance necessary to re-establish SAP. A student on Financial Aid Warning is still eligible to receive financial aid. If, at the end of the academic term during which the student was placed on Financial Aid Warning status, the student’s academic progress is above both thresholds for SAP, the student is removed from Financial Aid Warning.

    Financial Aid Probation for Students in Credit Hour Programs

    If, at the end of the academic term during which the student was placed on Financial Aid Warning status, the student’s academic progress is not above both SAP thresholds for pace and CGPA, the student is subject to dismissal. The student is no longer eligible to receive federal financial aid. This decision is subject to appeal by the student as defined below. Upon approval of a student appeal, the student will be placed on Financial Aid Probation. Eligibility for federal financial aid may only be reinstated for one payment period.


    Appeals of Adverse Determinations

    Students who are ineligible to receive financial aid and/or are academically ineligible to continue due to unsatisfactory academic progress are advised immediately following the determination. Students may submit a written appeal to the Academic Review Committee.

    This appeal should be filed within five (5) business days of notification of the decision and must explain in writing the circumstances leading to their unsatisfactory academic performance and how those circumstances have been resolved, ensuring they are successful going forward. The Academic Review Committee will consider all information including potential mitigating circumstances such as a severe illness, medical condition or injury, the death of a family member or other special circumstances presented by the student. The Academic Review Committee will uphold or deny the appeal within five (5) business days following receipt of the appeal from the student. A student who has been placed on probation due to unsatisfactory academic progress must have an appeal upheld in order to remain enrolled. This should occur prior to the final drop/add date of the academic term in order to in order to make appropriate scheduling adjustments. The student should attend class while the appeal is being reviewed.

    If an appeal is denied, the student will be dismissed and is ineligible to receive financial aid. If the appeal is upheld, the student will be placed on Financial Aid Probation status for one academic term. An academic plan will be created for the student, and the student will be considered eligible to receive financial aid. The academic plan must be structured so that a student reestablishes SAP within a reasonable timeframe. The student’s performance against the academic plan will be reviewed at the end of each academic term with the use of an Academic Plan Reviewed document. If, at the end of an academic term the student’s performance is consistent with the terms of the academic plan, the student remains eligible to receive financial aid and may continue in school for the subsequent academic term. If, at the end of an academic term the student’s performance is determined to be unsatisfactory, the student will be dismissed from the program of study. Students on academic plans will be advised at the end of each academic term to ensure that they understand their required performance for reestablishing satisfactory academic progress by the end of the plan.

    A student may be dismissed at any time if the Academic Review Committee does not believe the student will be successful in upholding the Academic Plan. In those cases, the student may submit an additional appeal to continue. A student may reestablish satisfactory academic progress upon successful completion of an academic term by meeting the thresholds listed in the SAP tables above. Students who re-establish satisfactory academic progress are advised they no longer need to be on an academic plan and remain eligible to receive financial aid.

    Financial Aid Dismissal for Students in Credit Hour Programs

    If the student’s academic progress is not above both SAP thresholds for pace and CGPA after an academic term on Financial Aid Probation, the student will be placed on Financial Aid Dismissal and is no longer eligible to receive federal financial aid. If the student is making sufficient progress while in this status, the student will receive an Academic Plan Reviewed document to continue eligibility. If the student does not make sufficient progress, the student will be dismissed, subject to additional appeal.

    The following SAP standards are for Clock Hour Programs:

    Evaluation Points: Clock Hour Programs will have an academic evaluation at the end of each grading period and a financial aid SAP evaluation after the student has attempted the expected hours in an academic term. All students re-entering after a period of non-attendance will have their most recent SAP status reviewed to determine eligibility to return. Re-entries will be evaluated for financial aid SAP after attempting the required hours for the payment period in which they returned. SAP is determined by measuring the student’s cumulative grade point average (CGPA) and the student’s pace toward completion of clock hours attempted in the academic program. The calculated CGPA and pace are compared against thresholds to determine whether or not the student meets SAP (at or above threshold).

    For clock hour programs, the clock hours attempted are the total clock hours required for courses in which the student is enrolled after the drop/add date and for which a grade has been entered. Clock hours earned are the hours for the courses in which the student successfully completes and earns a passing grade at the end of the grading period.

    Satisfactory Progress Threshold for Clock Hour Programs:

    Clock Hour Programs

    CGPA

    Minimum Pace

      2.0

    66.67%



    At the end of an academic term, if a student’s CGPA or Pace is below the stated threshold, the student’s academic progress is considered to be unsatisfactory.

    Maximum Timeframe/Maximum Program Length

    A student must complete an academic program in no more than one and one half (1.5) times the published normal program length. Repeat courses taken as part of a Title IV program are included in the Maximum Timeframe calculation.

    To determine the maximum timeframe for programs measured in clock hours, take the published number of clock hours necessary to graduate and multiply by 1.5.

    Example:

    1200 Published Clock Hours X 1.5 Maximum Timeframe = 1800 Maximum Clock Hours Attempted Permitted to Complete the Program

    If, at any time, it is determined to be mathematically impossible for a student to complete the program of study within the Maximum Timeframe, the student will be ineligible for additional Title IV funding and dismissed from the program of study.

    Students may appeal dismissal for extenuating circumstances and must meet with the Director of Education for the appeal process. If approved, the student's cGPA will continue to update based on the Repeated Courses policy where the highest grade will be applied in each repeated course. However, the student will remain ineligible to receive financial aid.

    Please see each course outline in this catalog for a program level explanation of what qualifies as maximum timeframe.

    Unsatisfactory Academic Progress

    Students not meeting SAP are subject to dismissal from their programs of study and are ineligible to receive financial aid, except under certain circumstances.


    Academic SAP Statuses (Clock Hour programs only)

    When a student finishes an academic term but has not yet reached a payment period and is below the SAP standards, the student will hit academic evaluation points. If a student is below SAP standards prior to hitting the first payment period, the student will be placed on Academic Warning. Prior to subsequent payment periods, the student may hit Academic Probation and Academic Dismissal. Academic statuses do not trigger documentation or paperwork but are points at which students should be advised of the potential for financial impacts if performance does not improve.

    Financial Aid Warning for Clock Hour Programs

    If a student’s progress in a clock hour program, measured after attempting the expected hours for the payment period is determined to be unsatisfactory, the school may place the student on Financial Aid Warning status for one payment period. The student will be advised of the performance necessary to re-establish SAP. A student on Financial Aid Warning is still eligible to receive financial aid. If, at the end of the payment period during which the student was placed on Financial Aid Warning status, the student’s academic progress is above both thresholds for SAP, the student is removed from Financial Aid Warning.

    Financial Aid Probation for Students in Clock Hour Programs

    If, after the student has attempted the expected hours for the next payment period, the student’s academic progress is not above both SAP thresholds for pace and CGPA, the student is no longer eligible to receive federal financial aid. This decision is subject to appeal by the student as defined below. Upon approval of a student appeal, the student will be placed on Financial Aid Probation. Eligibility for federal financial aid may only be reinstated for one payment period.

    Appeals of Adverse Determinations

    Students who are ineligible to receive financial aid and are academically ineligible to continue due to unsatisfactory academic progress are advised immediately following the determination. Students may submit a written appeal to the Academic Review Committee.

    This appeal should be filed prior to the end of the following term’s new student drop/add period and must explain in writing the circumstances leading to their unsatisfactory academic performance and how those circumstances have been resolved ensuring they are successful going forward. The Academic Review Committee will consider all information including potential mitigating circumstances such as a severe illness, medical condition or injury, the death of a family member or other special circumstances presented by the student. The Academic Review Committee will uphold or deny the appeal. A student who has been placed on academic probation due to unsatisfactory academic progress must have an appeal upheld in order to remain in school. This should occur prior to the final drop/add date of the academic term in order to in order to make appropriate scheduling adjustments. The student should attend class while the appeal is being reviewed.

    If an appeal is denied, the student will be dismissed and ineligible to receive financial aid. If the appeal is upheld, the student will be placed on Financial Aid Probation status for one payment period. An academic plan will be created for the student, and the student will be considered eligible to receive financial aid. The academic plan must be structured so that a student reestablishes SAP within a reasonable timeframe. The student’s performance against the academic plan will be reviewed at the end of each academic term with the use of an Academic Plan Reviewed document. If, at the end of an academic term the student’s performance is consistent with the terms of the academic plan, the student remains eligible to receive financial aid and may continue in school for the subsequent academic term. If, at the end of a payment period the student’s performance is determined to be unsatisfactory, the student will be dismissed from the program of study. Students on academic plans will be advised at the end of each academic term to ensure that they understand their required performance for reestablishing satisfactory academic progress by the end of the plan. A student may be dismissed at any time if the Academic Review Committee does not believe the student will be successful in upholding the Academic Plan. In those cases, the student may submit an additional appeal to continue. The student may be required to complete the Retake program as a condition of approving their appeal. A student may reestablish satisfactory academic progress upon successful completion of an academic term by meeting the thresholds listed in the SAP tables above. Students who re-establish satisfactory academic progress are advised that they no longer need to be on an academic plan and remain eligible to receive financial aid.

    Financial Aid Dismissal for Students in Clock Hour Programs

    If, after the student has attempted the expected hours for the third and all remaining consecutive payment periods, the student’s academic progress is not above both SAP thresholds for pace and CGPA, the student will be placed on Financial Aid Dismissal and is no longer eligible to receive federal financial aid. If the student is making sufficient progress while in this status, the student will receive an Academic Plan Reviewed document to continue eligibility. If the student does not make sufficient progress, the student will be dismissed, subject to additional appeal.

    Students Receiving Veterans Education Benefits

    Students using Veterans Education Benefits are subject to the same calculations of CGPA and Pace, but have different limitations as to how long they may remain not meeting Satisfactory Academic Progress standards. Students using Veterans Education Benefits will be subject to the following limitations.
    Students will no longer eligible to be certified for Veterans Education Benefits once they fail to meet SAP standards for a third consecutive SAP evaluation period. This means students who fail to meet SAP at the end of their Financial Aid Probation term will have their benefits terminated. Student will only be eligible for certification if they return to Satisfactory Academic Progress. If a student exceeds Maximum Time Frame as defined in the SAP policy above, they are no longer eligible to be certified for Veterans Education Benefits.

    Other Factors Impacting Academic Standing for Credit and Clock Hour Programs

    Program Changes: When a student transfers to a new program, the total program length of the new program is used as a basis for determining the maximum program length. All previously attempted coursework that is applicable in the new program is carried forward into the new program, whether it was completed successfully or not (i.e., including grades of F or W), for the purposes of calculating both qualitative and quantitative academic progress. A student who is not meeting SAP standards is not eligible for a program change without approval of the Director of Education or designee. This also applies to students who were not meeting SAP standards at the point of being withdrawn and wish to re-enter in a different program.

    Transfer and Proficiency Credits: Transfer and Proficiency credits are entered as grades of “T” or “TO” which are not computed in a student’s qualitative grade point average. Transfer and proficiency credits are counted as credits attempted and earned for the purposes of calculating a student’s pace of progress in the program. See also Transfer of Credit in this catalog. These grades will be used in calculating both qualitative grade point average and pace of progress as defined in the Standards of Academic Progress policy.

    Additional Degrees/Diplomas: Degree or diploma students who wish to remain continuously enrolled and pursue an additional program must complete all requirements of the first program before enrolling in a subsequent program. Any successfully completed courses that are contained in the subsequent program will be counted towards completion of that program. (Note: students may not be enrolled concurrently in and receive funding for two Title IV eligible programs).

    Pass/Fail Courses
    Grades of S and U are assigned to classes that do not fulfill graduation requirements such as English Language Foundation (ELF) courses that are graded on a pass/fail basis. A grade of W* is assigned for withdrawal from a Pass/Fail class for certain programs after the drop/add period. Foundation courses may not be repeated more than one time without an approved foundations appeal.

    Repeated Courses While in an Active Degree Seeking Status

    F, U, NA, NP, W, and W* grades require repeating and are retained on the transcript. Repeated courses will appear on the transcript with both the new letter grade earned and the original letter grade earned. The highest grade will replace the other attempts for the purposes of calculating the CGPA. Courses which have been repeated will count as credits/hours attempted for the purposes of calculating pace. Students in clock hour programs may not receive financial aid for repeated courses. Students in credit hour programs may receive financial aid to repeat failed courses. Other than Foundation courses, which can only be repeated a single time without appeal approval, there is no fixed limit to the number of times a particular course may be repeated as long as a student is making satisfactory academic progress. As of July 1, 2011, a student’s enrollment status in a term-based, credit hour program for Title IV purposes may include coursework being repeated that was previously taken in the program, but may not include more than one repetition of a specific, previously passed course. The original grade and the repeated grade will both appear on the transcript. Only the highest grade will count for purposes of calculating the CGPA. All attempts count in the pace of the program.

    Audited Courses

    Audited courses are assigned a grade of AU. Audited courses do not count as credits attempted or credits earned for any purposes and do not have any effect on the calculations of pace or GPA.

    Grades and CGPA

    The following table summarizes the effect of specific grades on the calculations of pace and CGPA:

    Grade

    Credits Attempted for Pace

    Credits Attempted for CGPA

    Credits Earned

    Quality Points Per Credit

    A

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes

    4

    B

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes

    3

    C

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes

    2

    D

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes

    1

    F

    Yes

    Yes

    No

    0

    S

    No

    No

    No

    N/A

    U

    No

    No

    No

    N/A

    W

    Yes

    No

    No

    N/A

    W*

    No

    No

    No

    N/A

    T

    Yes

    No

    Yes

    N/A

    I

    Yes

    No

    No

    N/A

    TO

    Yes

    No

    Yes

    N/A

    AU

    No

    No

    No

    N/A

    P or PASS

    Yes

    No

    Yes

    N/A

    NP

    Yes

    No

    Yes

    N/A

    IE

    Yes

    No

    No

    N/A

    #A

    Yes

    No

    Yes

    N/A

    #B

    Yes

    No

    Yes

    N/A

    #C

    Yes

    No

    Yes

    N/A

    UF

    Yes

    No

    No

    N/A

    Fail

    Yes

    No

    No

    N/A

    NA

    No

    No

    No

    N/A



    Students are able to access their student portal at any time to view academic progress, including grades.

    Withdrawal Grades for Institutional Withdrawals

    The W grade is assigned to class withdrawals when a student withdraws or stops attending all courses prior to the withdrawal deadline. The earned grade in the course is awarded after the withdrawal deadline.

    Withdrawal Grades for Individual Course Withdrawals

    A course is unregistered during the drop/add period for a student who maintains enrollment in one or more course. Courses dropped after the drop/add period but prior to the withdrawal deadline are issued a grade of W (Withdrawal). The earned grade in the course is awarded after the withdrawal deadline.


    A grade of W* is recorded for Pass/Fail courses (campus credits) dropped after the drop/add period or for courses being withdrawn during an LOA period. The W* may also be used in rare instances when a correction needs to be made to a student’s schedule based on a documented issue. A grade of NA is recorded for module-based courses that are dropped after drop/add but prior to the start of the module in which the course was scheduled. W grades count as credits attempted but not earned for the purposes of calculating the pace in academic progress and are excluded from CGPA. W* and NA grades are excluded from both the CGPA and Pace components of SAP.

    Incomplete Grades

    Incomplete grades count as credits/hours attempted but not completed. When the Incomplete is converted to a letter grade, it will be computed as credits/hours completed or failed, depending on the grade assigned. 
     
     

    Repeated Coursework

    A student’s enrollment status in a term-based program for Title IV purposes may include previously passed coursework being repeated in the program, but may not include more than one repetition of a specific previously passed course.

    A student may also request to audit any course within their program version with their Director of Education.

     

    Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act

    All students shall have the right to inspect and review their educational records, to request corrections or deletions, and to limit disclosure of the records in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (also referred to as the Buckley Amendment).

    The Registrar oversees the educational records.  Students may request a review of their records by writing to the Registrar or his/her designee and identifying the record(s) they wish to review.  Such review will be allowed during regular school office hours under appropriate supervision and within 45 days of the date the request is received by the school.  A copy of the records may be obtained for $1.00 per page.  When grades are included, the transcript charge applies.

    A student may request the school to amend his/her educational records on the grounds that they are inaccurate, misleading, or in violation of his/her right to privacy. However, grades and course evaluations can be challenged only on the grounds that they are improperly recorded. The student should write to the Registrar and identify the part of the record he or she wants to change and specify why it is inaccurate. The Registrar, together with other involved school personnel, will review the written request and confer with the student to make a determination.  If the student is not satisfied with the result of the conference, the school will notify the student of his or her right to a formal grievance hearing. Within 45 days of the hearing, the student will be provided with a written decision, which will be considered final. Written documentation of the hearing and of the decision will be included as part of the student’s permanent record.

    The following are exemptions to FERPA: 

    • Financial records submitted by a student’s parent(s);
    • Grades and access to student education records to parents who certify that the student is financially dependent;
    • A school official who has a legitimate educational interest and needs to review an educational record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility.  A school official is a person employed by the school in an administrative, supervisory, academic, research, or support staff position, or a person or company with whom the school has contracted, such as an attorney, auditor, collection agent, employment agency, or loan management agency, or a person serving on the Board of Governors, or a student serving on an official committee or assisting another school official in performing his/her tasks; 
    • Confidential letters of recommendation received by the school prior to January 1, 1975.  For such letters received after December 31,1974, the Act permits students to waive their right to access if the letters are related to admissions, employment, or honors;
    • School security records;
    • Employment records for school employees who are not current students;
    • Records compiled or maintained by physicians, psychiatrists, psychologists, or other recognized professionals or paraprofessionals acting or assisting in such capacities for treatment purposes, and which are available only to persons providing the treatment; 
    •  Authorized representatives of the U.S. Government, state and local  authorities where required, and accrediting agencies;
    •  Appropriate persons or agencies in the event of a health or safety emergency, when a release without consent is necessary under the circumstances; and
    • Records requested through court order or subpoena. 

    The school will generally release certain student directory information without the consent of the student unless the student has specifically requested that the information not be released.  The student should inform the school in writing within ten (10) days after the first date of attendance if the student does not wish to have any or all of such information released by the school.  Such directory information includes some or all of the following data: student’s name, address(es), telephone number, e-mail address, program, dates of attendance, photograph, diploma awarded, post-graduation employers and job titles, participation in activities and recognition received, previous secondary and postsecondary educational institutions attended by the student, and date and place of birth.   

    The school also reserves the right to release to police agencies and/or crime victims any records or information pertinent to a crime which has occurred on campus, including the details of and disciplinary action taken against the alleged perpetrator of the crime.  The student has the right to file a complaint concerning alleged failures by the school to comply with the requirements of FERPA at the following U.S. Department of Education office:

    Family Policy Compliance Office
    U.S. Department of Education
    400 Maryland Avenue, SW
    Washington, DC 20202-5901 

    Additional information on FERPA is available from the Campus Director’s office.

     

    Directed Study

    Courses are offered via directed study only when extraordinary circumstances warrant. Requests for directed study will be evaluated on a case-by case basis as determined by the Director of Education and/or the Program Director.  Directed study involves a high level of independence and self-direction on the part of the student to read, conduct research, and complete written examinations, reports, research papers, and similar assignments designed to measure the student’s grasp of the subject matter. Under the supervision of a faculty member, a learning contract shall be developed which outlines specific learning objectives, texts, supplemental readings, course requirements, evaluative criteria, and examination dates. Because directed study classes are the exception and not the rule, the number of courses that a student will be allowed to take in directed study will be limited.  In all cases, the directed study contract must demonstrate that the student receives an appropriate combination of instructional time and assignments to be completed outside of class to master the stated course objectives. The following factors will be carefully evaluated prior to granting a request for an independent study: 
    • The student’s grade point average;
    • The student’s proximity to graduation;
    • The existence of extenuating circumstances or hardships that prevent the student from taking the course on campus; and
    • The availability of distance-education sections of the course.
    The directed study should not be granted for the purpose of allowing a student to repeat a class he or she has failed or from which he or she has withdrawn.  The directed study should not be granted to fill a schedule or allow an easy transition back into school for a student who has withdrawn for one or more terms.
     

    Programs of Study

    The following programs of study are offered at The Creative Circus:

    Certificate
        • Art Direction
        • Copywriting
        • Graphic Design
        • Image
        • Interactive Development

    The following courses are offered at The Creative Circus (These courses are not included within the school's scope of accreditation with ACCSC and are not eligible for Title IV funding):

    Certificate of Completion
        • Summer at the Circus


     

    Art Direction

    Certificate

    Program Objective

    The Art Direction program is focused on preparing each student for a creative career in communication arts. The program teaches strategic thinking, collaboration, color theory, typography, layout design, mastery of design software, corporate branding, and media (both traditional and emerging). Upon graduation, students have mastery of the process of creating original, compelling brand communication, and they have portfolios that enable them to compete for and secure the best art direction jobs in the advertising and commercial communication arts field.



     Major & Related RequirementsQuarter Credit Hours
     CL100Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     CL200Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     CL300Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     CL400Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     CL500Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     CL600Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     CL700Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     CL800Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     AD401Layout 11.65
     AD501Layout 21.65
     CG904Indesign/Illustrator1.65
     CG925Digital 11.65
     DS104Trademarks1.65
     DS520Brand Extensions1.65
     DS606Branding1.65
     GE101Strategy1.65
     GE102Introduction to Creative Thinking1.65
     GR801Graduate Portfolio Review/Job Preparation1.65
     TM210Introduction to Creative Team1.65
     TM310Creative Team 31.65
     TM311Advertising Concepts 11.65
     TM410Creative Team 41.65
     TM411Advertising Concepts 21.65
     TM510Creative Team 51.65
     TM511Advertising Concepts 31.65
     TM601Interdisciplinary Team 11.65
     TM610Creative Team 6: Alternative Marketing1.65
     TM611Advertising Concepts 41.65
     TM710Creative Team 71.65
     TM711Advertising Concepts 51.65
     TM814Concepting for the Portfolio1.65
     VS101Typography 11.65
     VS102Introduction to Graphic Design1.65
     VS201Typography 21.65
     VS202Color Theory1.65
     VS203Production Methodologies1.65
     VS301Typography 31.65
     XXXXXElective4.95
     Total96.8

     Total Quarter Credit Hours Required for Graduation96.8

    Students complete this program in 8 terms or 88 weeks.

    The Creative Circus is a portfolio school where students perfect their portfolios, learn to collaborate as a team, and pitch their ideas and strategies. Student portfolios are reviewed quarterly by a panel of faculty and industry experts. Based on their quarterly portfolio panel review, students in the Art Direction program they may be scheduled to take courses outside of their approved program of study to ensure they can meet the objectives in the Art Direction program. All course substitutions must be approved by the Director of Education.


        
     

    Copywriting

    Certificate

    Program Objective

    The Copywriting program is focused on preparing each student for a career in communication arts. The program teaches strategic thinking, collaboration, basics of headline and long copy writing, basic page design and typography, competency of design software, branding, and media (both traditional and emerging). Upon graduation, students have mastery of the process of creating original, strategic, compelling brand communication, and they have portfolios that enable them to compete for and secure the best writing jobs in the advertising and commercial communication arts field.



     Major & Related RequirementsQuarter Credit Hours
     CG904Indesign/Illustrator1.65
     CG925Digital 11.65
     CL100Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     CW101Introduction to Copywriting1.65
     CW104Art Direction for Copywriting1.65
     CW106Headlines1.65
     CW720Copycrafting 11.65
     CW805Professional Development for Copywriting1.65
     DS520Brand Extensions1.65
     DS760Cultural Media1.65
     GE101Strategy1.65
     GE102Introduction to Creative Thinking1.65
     CL200Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     CW201Developing Your Voice1.65
     CW203Writing for Radio1.65
     TM210Introduction to Creative Team1.65
     CL300Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     CW301Copy 11.65
     TM310Creative Team 31.65
     TM311Advertising Concepts 11.65
     CL400Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     TM410Creative Team 41.65
     TM411Advertising Concepts 21.65
     CL500Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     TM510Creative Team 51.65
     TM511Advertising Concepts 31.65
     CL600Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     CW601Writing Long Copy1.65
     TM601Interdisciplinary Team 11.65
     TM610Creative Team 6: Alternative Marketing1.65
     TM611Advertising Concepts 41.65
     CL700Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     TM710Creative Team 71.65
     TM711Advertising Concepts 51.65
     CL800Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     CW820Copycrafting 21.65
     GR801Graduate Portfolio Review/Job Preparation1.65
     XXXXXElectives4.95
     Total96.8

     Total Quarter Credit Hours Required for Graduation96.8

    The Creative Circus is a portfolio school where students perfect their portfolios, learn to collaborate as a team, and pitch their ideas and strategies. Student portfolios are reviewed quarterly by a panel of faculty and industry experts. Based on their quarterly portfolio panel review, students in the Copywriting program they may be scheduled to take courses outside of their approved program of study to ensure they can meet the objectives in the Copywriting program. All course substitutions must be approved by the Director of Education.


        
     

    Graphic Design

    Certificate

    Program Objective

    The Graphic Design Program is focused on providing the best possible training in the thinking, art, craft and technology for the design field. The program teaches strategic thinking, collaboration, color theory, typography, layout design, mastery of design software, branding, dimensional and experiential design, and media (both traditional and emerging). The department works closely with the student during his/her tenure at The Circus to develop a portfolio and to offer all possible assistance in helping them secure employment in the best possible position. Upon graduation, students have mastery of the process of creating original, compelling brand communication, and they have portfolios that enable them to compete for and secure a job in the commercial communication arts field.



     Major & Related RequirementsQuarter Credit Hours
     CG925Digital 11.65
     CL100Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     DS104Trademarks1.65
     DS505Corporate Identity1.65
     DS506Publication Design1.65
     DS520Brand Extensions1.65
     DS705Professional Practices1.65
     DS760Cultural Media1.65
     DV200Information Architecture1.65
     GE101Strategy1.65
     GE102Introduction to Creative Thinking1.65
     GE976Books, Boxes & Portfolios 21.65
     GR801Graduate Portfolio Review/Job Preparation1.65
     TM601Interdisciplinary Team 11.65
     VS101Typography 11.65
     VS102Introduction to Graphic Design1.65
     VS203Production Methodologies1.65
     VS302Advanced Color Theory1.65
     CG904Indesign/Illustrator1.65
     CL200Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     VS201Typography 21.65
     VS202Color Theory1.65
     CL300Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     VS301Typography 31.65
     CG921Web Design1.65
     CL400Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     DS401Illustration for Design1.65
     DS403Package Design1.65
     VS401Design Concepts1.65
     CG913Photoshop 21.65
     CL500Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     CL600Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     DS606Branding1.65
     CL700Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     CL800Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     DS803Creative Sequential Design1.65
     XXXXXElectives6.6
     Total96.8

     Total Quarter Credit Hours Required for Graduation96.8

    The Creative Circus is a portfolio school where students perfect their portfolios, learn to collaborate as a team, and pitch their ideas and strategies. Student portfolios are reviewed quarterly by a panel of faculty and industry experts. Based on their quarterly portfolio panel review, students in the Graphic Design program they may be scheduled to take courses outside of their approved program of study to ensure they can meet the objectives in the Graphic Design program. All course substitutions must be approved by the Director of Education.
        
     

    Image

    Certificate

    Program Objective

    The Image Program is focused on providing balanced and versatile training in the art, craft and technology necessary for working in the field of Commercial Photography. The program stresses Strategic Thinking, Digital Workflow, Image Manipulation, Team Collaboration, and Professional Practices. The Image Department works closely with the student during his/her tenure at The Circus to develop a unique portfolio that represents their area of specialization, and to offer all possible assistance in helping them secure employment. Upon graduation, students have a clear understanding of the production process, the marketplace and its expectations, and possess portfolios that enable them to compete for and secure a job in the Commercial Photography field.



     Major & Related RequirementsQuarter Credit Hours
     CL100Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     IM100Basic Lighting1.65
     CL200Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     CL300Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     CL400Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     CL500Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     CL600Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     CL700Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     CL800Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     DV303Motion Graphics Basic1.65
     DV304Video Editing I1.65
     GE920Film/Video/TV Production1.65
     GR803Advanced Specialized Study1.65
     IM110Digital Photography 11.65
     IM120Digital Color Management1.65
     IM200Advanced Lighting1.65
     IM210Digital Photography 21.65
     IM220Visual Thinking for Photographers1.65
     IM130Image Boot Camp1.65
     IM310Introduction to Portraiture1.65
     IM320Introduction to Product Illustration1.65
     IM340Documentary Photography1.65
     IM350Equipment & Tools1.65
     IM410Competitions for Photographers1.65
     IM420Fashion and Beauty1.65
     IM430Interiors and Exteriors1.65
     IM510Tabletop/Still Life Photography1.65
     IM520Corporate Photography1.65
     IM620Styling1.65
     IM640Weddings1.65
     IM720Individual Projects 11.65
     IM730Business and Marketing1.65
     IM810Graduate Portfolio Development1.65
     IM820Individual Projects 21.65
     IM830Assisting Workshop1.65
     IM840Directed Studies 11.65
     TM601Interdisciplinary Team 11.65
     VS202Color Theory1.65
     XXXXXElective3.3
     Total96.8

     Total Quarter Credit Hours Required for Graduation96.8

    The Creative Circus is a portfolio school where students perfect their portfolios, learn to collaborate as a team, and pitch their ideas and strategies. Student portfolios are reviewed quarterly by a panel of faculty and industry experts. Based on their quarterly portfolio panel review, students in the Image program they may be scheduled to take courses outside of their approved program of study to ensure they can meet the objectives in the Image program. All course substitutions must be approved by the Director of Education.
        
     

    Interactive Development

    Certificate

    Program Objective

    The Interactive Development program focuses on preparing students for a successful career in the digital communications industry. The program teaches strategic thinking, collaboration, programming languages and logic, art production, animation and other skills necessary for successful web development. The program teaches strategic thinking, collaboration, programming logic, creative use of technology and the daily processes required to produce engaging and innovative interactive media. Upon graduation students have a mastery of the primary languages of the web and can produce engaging interactive media taking advantage of new standards and trends online. Upon graduation students have a mastery of the primary languages of the web and the processes and skills required to produce successful creative media. Students will have unique portfolios showcasing their technical skills and their abilities to work with creative teams to produce successful projects.


     Major & Related RequirementsQuarter Credit Hours
     CL100Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     DV100Web Development1.65
     DV101Strategy for Interactive Media1.65
     CL200Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     DV200Information Architecture1.65
     DV201Web Development1.65
     DV202Web Animation1.65
     CL300Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     DV301Web Design and Implementation Advanced1.65
     DV302Rich Media Development 21.65
     DV303Motion Graphics Basic1.65
     DV304Video Editing I1.65
     CL400Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     DV402Web Animation Advanced1.65
     CL500Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     DV500Object-Oriented Programming1.65
     CL600Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     CL700Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     CG925Digital 11.65
     CL800Creative Comprehensive Lab5.5
     DV107Illustrator/Photoshop1.65
     DV130Web Production Studio1.65
     DV190Professional Practices1.65
     DV191Graduate Studio1.65
     DV203User Experience1.65
     DV230Web Advertising Studio1.65
     DV311Introduction to Programming1.65
     DV330Interactive Studio 11.65
     DV401Web Development 41.65
     DV411Web Development Studio1.65
     DV421Application Development1.65
     DV430Interactive Studio 21.65
     DV501Web Development 51.65
     DV502Rich Media Development 41.65
     DV530Interactive Studio 31.65
     DV630Mobile Application Studio1.65
     XXXXXElective6.6
     Total96.8

     Total Quarter Credit Hours Required for Graduation96.8

    The Creative Circus is a portfolio school where students perfect their portfolios, learn to collaborate as a team, and pitch their ideas and strategies. Student portfolios are reviewed quarterly by a panel of faculty and industry experts. Based on their quarterly portfolio panel review, students in the Interactive Development program they may be scheduled to take courses outside of their approved program of study to ensure they can meet the objectives in the Art Direction program. All course substitutions must be approved by the Director of Education.
        
     

    Summer at the Circus

    Certificate of Completion

    Program Objective

    This is a non-terminal program developed in full partnership with the University of Georgia. It is a designed as an 8-week Summer program that will expose the advertising student to an understanding of portfolio development and to how ads are created.


     Major & Related RequirementsClock Hours
     ADPR5991-2Advanced Creative Explorations II - Dipping Your Toe in Type30
     ADPR5991-3Advanced Creative Explorations II - Board Games - Applied Creativity30
     ADPR5992-1Advanced Creative Exploration I: Idea Development & Creative Teams30
     ADPR5992-2Advanced Creative Exploration I: Using Creative Suite Effectively30
     ADPR5992-3Advanced Creative Exploration I: Art Direction for Everyone30
     ADPR5992-4Advanced Creative Exploration I: Creative Strategy & Selling Creative Ideas30
     ADPR5993-1Advanced Creative Exploration II: Photo & Video Basics for Marketing Comm.30
     ADPR5993-2Advanced Creative Exploration II: DeathMatch: Concepting to Win30
     Total240

     Total Clock Hours Required for Completion240


        
     

    Course Descriptions

    Course Numbering System

    The course numbering system is a series of letters which identify course subject areas followed by a series of numbers that identify course level:
    AD
     Art Direction
    ADP
     Advanced Creative Explorations
    CG
     Graphic Design
    CL
     Creative Lab
    CW
     Copywriting
    DS
     Design
    DV
     Web Design
    GE
     Graphic Design
    GR
     Capstone
    IM
     Electrical
    TM
     Teamwork
    VS
     Visual Arts
       
    The first number of the three digits indicates the level of the course:
    0 Preparatory courses
    1 Normally a first-year course
    2 Normally a second-year course
       
    General Education Courses are designated by **

    Individual courses are approved to run online. Please see the Director of Education for a list of available online courses.

    Prerequisites and course hours are identified at the end of the course description:
    (AA-BB-CC-DD, E) at the ending of each course description where AA is Lecture hours, BB is Lab hours, CC is Externship Hours, DD is Outside Hours, and E is Total Quarter Credit Hours
       
     Art Direction (AD)

    AD401 Layout 1 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Basic awareness of spatial relationships of headlines, photos, body copy, logos, and white space. Prerequisite(s): ( VS102 ) (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    AD501 Layout 2 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    The course focus is on more intricate layouts. Multi-visual, run-around typography, mixed media, multi-page layouts, brochures. Prerequisite(s): ( AD401 ) (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

     Advanced Creative Explorations (ADP)

    ADPR5991-2 Advanced Creative Explorations II - Dipping Your Toe in Type 30 Clock Hours
    Creative problem solving and concepting; game development; storytelling; packaging and marketing; digital knowledge and transmedia storytelling; new technology landscape and tools for brand building. (30-0-0-0)

    ADPR5991-3 Advanced Creative Explorations II - Board Games - Applied Creativity 30 Clock Hours
    Creative problem solving and concepting; game development; storytelling; packaging and marketing; digital knowledge and transmedia storytelling; new technology landscape and tools for brand building. (30-0-0-0)

    ADPR5992-1 Advanced Creative Exploration I: Idea Development & Creative Teams 30 Clock Hours
    Creative writing and copywriting; layout and design; color theory; branding and personality; critical thinking; portfolio building and pitching ideas; advanced techniques in Adobe CS6 (Photoshop, Illustrator Infographics, Web Design, Package Design, Digital Magazines). (10-20-0-0)

    ADPR5992-2 Advanced Creative Exploration I: Using Creative Suite Effectively 30 Clock Hours
    Creative writing and copywriting; layout and design; color theory; branding and personality; critical thinking; portfolio building and pitching ideas; advanced techniques in Adobe CS6 (Photoshop, Illustrator Infographics, Web Design, Package Design, Digital Magazines). (10-20-0-0)

    ADPR5992-3 Advanced Creative Exploration I: Art Direction for Everyone 30 Clock Hours
    Creative writing and copywriting; layout and design; color theory; branding and personality; critical thinking; portfolio building and pitching ideas; advanced techniques in Adobe CS6 (Photoshop, Illustrator Infographics, Web Design, Package Design, Digital Magazines). (10-20-0-0)

    ADPR5992-4 Advanced Creative Exploration I: Creative Strategy & Selling Creative Ideas 30 Clock Hours
    Creative writing and copywriting; layout and design; color theory; branding and personality; critical thinking; portfolio building and pitching ideas; advanced techniques in Adobe CS6 (Photoshop, Illustrator Infographics, Web Design, Package Design, Digital Magazines). (10-20-0-0)

    ADPR5993-1 Advanced Creative Exploration II: Photo & Video Basics for Marketing Comm. 30 Clock Hours
    Creative problem solving and concepting; game development; storytelling; packaging and marketing; digital knowledge and transmedia storytelling; new technology landscape and tools for brand building. (10-20-0-0)

    ADPR5993-2 Advanced Creative Exploration II: DeathMatch: Concepting to Win 30 Clock Hours
    Creative problem solving and concepting; game development; storytelling; packaging and marketing; digital knowledge and transmedia storytelling; new technology landscape and tools for brand building. (10-20-0-0)

     Graphic Design (CG)

    CG904 Indesign/Illustrator 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Introduces the student to the Adobe Indesign desktop publishing software application and to the Illustrator vector drawing program. Indesign is used to create posters, flyers, brochures, magazines, newspapers and books. Illustrator can be used to draw illustrations, cartoons, diagrams, charts and logos using mathematical equations to draw out the shapes. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    CG913 Photoshop 2 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    This course introduces the student to the standard industry software for image manipulation. The student learns the basics of utilizing program capabilities such as scanning, photo retouching, color correcting, subject rearrangement and other image editing functions. Prerequisite(s): ( CG900 ) (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    CG925 Digital 1 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    This seminar course will introduce students to the concepts behind using new media and trend spotting in advertising. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

     Creative Lab (CL)

    CL100 Creative Comprehensive Lab 5.5 Quarter Credit Hours
    Directed assimilation of all knowledge and skills learned from quarter to quarter are integrated into pieces of work for a portfolio and perfecting the student's evolving portfolio. Student's attendance at the weekly forum is mandatory. The attendance in forum and their final Panel presentation of their portfolio are essential pieces in calculating their final grade. (0-110-0-27.5, 5.5)

    CL200 Creative Comprehensive Lab 5.5 Quarter Credit Hours
    Directed assimilation of all knowledge and skills learned from quarter to quarter are integrated into pieces of work for a portfolio and perfecting the student's evolving portfolio. Student's attendance at the weekly forum is mandatory. The attendance in forum and their final Panel presentation of their portfolio are essential pieces in calculating their final grade. (0-110-0-27.5, 5.5)

    CL300 Creative Comprehensive Lab 5.5 Quarter Credit Hours
    Directed assimilation of all knowledge and skills learned from quarter to quarter are integrated into pieces of work for a portfolio and perfecting the student's evolving portfolio. Student's attendance at the weekly forum is mandatory. The attendance in forum and their final Panel presentation of their portfolio are essential pieces in calculating their final grade. (0-110-0-27.5, 5.5)

    CL400 Creative Comprehensive Lab 5.5 Quarter Credit Hours
    Directed assimilation of all knowledge and skills learned from quarter to quarter are integrated into pieces of work for a portfolio and perfecting the student's evolving portfolio. Student's attendance at the weekly forum is mandatory. The attendance in forum and their final Panel presentation of their portfolio are essential pieces in calculating their final grade. (0-110-0-27.5, 5.5)

    CL500 Creative Comprehensive Lab 5.5 Quarter Credit Hours
    Directed assimilation of all knowledge and skills learned from quarter to quarter are integrated into pieces of work for a portfolio and perfecting the student's evolving portfolio. Student's attendance at the weekly forum is mandatory. The attendance in forum and their final Panel presentation of their portfolio are essential pieces in calculating their final grade. (0-110-0-27.5, 5.5)

    CL600 Creative Comprehensive Lab 5.5 Quarter Credit Hours
    Directed assimilation of all knowledge and skills learned from quarter to quarter are integrated into pieces of work for a portfolio and perfecting the student's evolving portfolio. Student's attendance at the weekly forum is mandatory. The attendance in forum and their final Panel presentation of their portfolio are essential pieces in calculating their final grade. (0-110-0-27.5, 5.5)

    CL700 Creative Comprehensive Lab 5.5 Quarter Credit Hours
    Directed assimilation of all materials learned from quarter to quarter, integrated into and perfecting the student's evolving portfolio. Student's attendance at the weekly forum and their final Panel presentation. (0-110-0-27.5, 5.5)

    CL800 Creative Comprehensive Lab 5.5 Quarter Credit Hours
    Directed assimilation of all knowledge and skills learned from quarter to quarter are integrated into pieces of work for a portfolio and perfecting the student's evolving portfolio. Student's attendance at the weekly forum is mandatory. The attendance in forum and their final Panel presentation of their portfolio are essential pieces in calculating their final grade. (0-110-0-27.5, 5.5)

     Copywriting (CW)

    CW101 Introduction to Copywriting 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    This introductory course will allow the student to begin to learn the rudimentary techniques of advertising headline and body copywriting, the economy of words and thought peculiar to this type of writing, and the necessity of creative thinking in written expression. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    CW104 Art Direction for Copywriting 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Taught by an art director, this course will familiarize copywriters with special skills, techniques, constraints and freedoms which those who will be their career partners face in the professional world. Discusses safety concerns such as: tools (e.g. Xacto knives, box cutters, etc.), poisonous and potentially dangerous and/or flammable materials (e.g. rubber cement thinner, spray mount, fixative, etc.), and fire prevention in the classroom and on the job. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    CW106 Headlines 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Marrying concept with design principles in order to create a cohesive, communicative end product. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    CW201 Developing Your Voice 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    The professional advertising writer must have a distinctly personal style in the way she or he approached a problem, whether conceptual or written. This course will encourage the student to overcome inhibitions and prejudices in order to allow her or him to gain experience and confidence in the value or her or his intrinsic talent and ability. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    CW203 Writing for Radio 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    The professional advertising writer must have a distinctly personal style in the way she or he approached a problem, whether conceptual or written. This course will encourage the student to overcome inhibitions and prejudices in order to allow her or him to gain experience and confidence in the value or her or his intrinsic talent and ability. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    CW301 Copy 1 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    This is not about building a book: it is about building the skills to build a book and draw attention to your work: style, emotion, grammar, rhythm, meaning, rewriting; in short, writing right. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    CW601 Writing Long Copy 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Here, students will learn to craft longer content, both for online use and offline. Interaction is stressed, but so is compelling use of language to tell a selling story. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    CW720 Copycrafting 1 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    The advanced copywriting student will break down and improve his/her copy, word by word, for possible portfolio pieces. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    CW805 Professional Development for Copywriting 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    This course will allow graduating Copywriters the opportunity to learn about professional best practices, self-promotion and career development. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    CW820 Copycrafting 2 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    In this advanced level class, copy is perfected for the final book. Prerequisite(s): ( CW720 ) (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

     Design (DS)

    DS104 Trademarks 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Learning that a logo is an advertisement, expression and visual representation in a simple wordless statement Prerequisite(s): ( VS401 ) (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DS401 Illustration for Design 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Students will create and complete original art for various media, formats, functions and problems with an emphasis on hand skills and mixed media utilizing both in-class and out-of-class learning activities to meet course objectives. Prerequisite(s): ( CG900 And VS401 And VS202 ) (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DS403 Package Design 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    This course pushes the idea of packaging and how a product and package can work together to make it more desirable. Students will develop skills to create and design for a variety of 3D problems. Prerequisite(s): ( CG900 And VS401 ) (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DS505 Corporate Identity 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    The course is designed to introduce and engage the student in the conceptual and technical understanding, execution and application of corporate identity as a system of communication. Prerequisite(s): ( VS301 And VS401 ) (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DS506 Publication Design 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Students create and design a publication (print and digital) that speaks about a subject with a clearly defined visual tone and personality. It's like Creative Thinking and Type 3 had a baby. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DS520 Brand Extensions 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Students from varied disciplines will come together in this course to concept and develop another dimension of an existing brand in an effort to enhance the client's opportunities for revenue. Prerequisite(s): ( VS401 And CG900 And VS101 And VS201 And VS301 ) (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DS606 Branding 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Explore brand identity and how to consider the logo, trademark, messaging and voice on a holistic level Prerequisite(s): ( VS401 And VS202 ) (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DS705 Professional Practices 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    This course will allow late quarter design students the opportunity to learn about professional best practices, self-promotion and career development. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DS760 Cultural Media 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    This class combines three creative disciplines in creating a CSR campaign for a company. Two projects will be completed by each team. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DS803 Creative Sequential Design 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Students will conceive and design materials (from a case statement to web site) used in a money-raising campaign for a non-profit company. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

     Web Design (DV)

    DV100 Web Development 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    This is an introduction to HTML and CSS, the primary tools needed for building web pages. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DV101 Strategy for Interactive Media 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Covers basic programming concepts using Javascript to introduce the students to core fundamental programming logic. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DV130 Web Production Studio 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    This class covers file preparation and basic production processes including studio, agency, freelance and client-side daily process and habits overview. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DV190 Professional Practices 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    This is a portfolio review for interactive designers and developers during which students focus on preparing their portfolios and other assets necessary for building a successful career. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DV191 Graduate Studio 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    This is a portfolio review for interactive designers and developers during which students focus on preparing their portfolios and other assets necessary for building a successful career. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DV201 Web Development 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Intermediate HTML and CSS including complex and dynamic web page layouts and introductory Javascript. Prerequisite(s): ( DV100 ) (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DV202 Web Animation 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Learn the fundamentals for creating timeline animations for the web using Adobe Flash. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DV203 User Experience 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Introduces students to concept ideation via gamestorming, essential interaction design principles and prototyping techniques and software tools. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DV230 Web Advertising Studio 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Design and build banners focusing on standards and covering primary types of rich ads. This class mixes designers and developers for the purpose of cranking out a lot of banners. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DV301 Web Design and Implementation Advanced 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Intermediate HTML and CSS including complex and dynamic web page layouts and introductory Javascript. Prerequisite(s): ( DV201 ) (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DV302 Rich Media Development 2 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Introduction to Actionscript 3 and animating with code. Prerequisite(s): ( DV202 ) (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DV303 Motion Graphics Basic 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Introduction to motion graphics using Adobe Aftereffects. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DV304 Video Editing I 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Video content for the web will be created using linear and compositing editing software. This course will utilize in-class and out-of-class learning activities to meet course objectives. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DV311 Introduction to Programming 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Introduces students to basic programming concepts using a variety of languages with a focus on core fundamental programming logic and structure. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DV330 Interactive Studio 1 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Design and build microsites and traditional web sites following professional interactive studio processes and working in teams. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DV401 Web Development 4 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    This course continues previous course work with a focus on integrating the languages and techniques learned so far to create modern web sites using HTML/CSS/Javascript and introduce students to connecting the user interface to the server using dynamic modern techniques (AJAX). (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DV402 Web Animation Advanced 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Introduction to the fundamentals of After Effects and the principles/concepts of animation and motion graphics. Prerequisite(s): ( DV302 ) (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DV411 Web Development Studio 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    This course reinforces materials learned in DV410 Web Development 4 by applying them through current real-world projects and goes further in-depth into whole project process focusing on the role of the developer. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DV421 Application Development 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    This course gives an overview of application development languages and introduces Flash application development to students via Adobe AIR. This course continues building students' Actionscript knowledge and gives an overview of AIR-specific classes. This class can support projects in Intermediate Actionscript and Mobile App Studio. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DV430 Interactive Studio 2 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Design and build deliverables and prototypes for integrated media campaigns that include sites, ads, apps, and other interactive media. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DV500 Object-Oriented Programming 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    This class's course materials are integrated tightly with Intro to Class-based Actionscript and students learn basic OOP principles while working on exercises and practical application of concepts learned in both AS3 classes during this quarter. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DV501 Web Development 5 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    This course introduces students to server-side scripting languages and common server scripting functions with PHP. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DV502 Rich Media Development 4 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    This course continues building Actionscript knowledge covering more standard classes necessary for building modern rich media interactive experiences. Dynamic content and layouts via externalized data are explored in this class. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DV530 Interactive Studio 3 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Design and build deliverables and prototypes for inventive digital media that include hardware integration, environmental installations and exploration of new interaction patterns and behaviors. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    DV630 Mobile Application Studio 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Invent and prototype a game-changing mobile app with an integrated creative team. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

     Graphic Design (GE)

    GE101 Strategy 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Introduces students to the basics of developing a creative strategy based on sound business principles, realistic budgets and focused demographics (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    GE102 Introduction to Creative Thinking 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Emphasis on the daily necessity for original thinking and writing in the creative field (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    GE920 Film/Video/TV Production 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Students concept broadcast/content and carry through storyboard to final production. Focus on production skills, such as shooting, editing, VO and sound design. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    GE976 Books, Boxes & Portfolios 2 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Projects are diverse and, as in real life, deadlines are short - usually weekly. So students must learn to think and work quickly. There may be some situations where the weekly assignments involves a teammate - usually a writer who needs help. The work is judged weekly, which determines the grades for the class. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

     Capstone (GR)

    GR801 Graduate Portfolio Review/Job Preparation 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    This class will focus on the job search, final portfolio with in]depth portfolio critiques, web]site, PDF electronic portfolio and traditional portfolio preparation. The contact, the interview, salaries, negotiations, working with recruiters, professionalism, and presentation will be covered. There will also be some portfolio review by guest reviewers. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    GR803 Advanced Specialized Study 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    This course allows advanced students to receive individualized feedback on book pieces, group critique as well as one-on-one instructor consultation. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

     Electrical (IM)

    IM100 Basic Lighting 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Light is one half of photography. To control the light one must be exposed to its properties and its variations. Daylight and tungsten light will be discussed and practiced through class assignments and demonstrations. Placement, intensity, metering and exposing of light are the basic controls a photographer must master. This is an introductory course in the nature and use of light. A lecture and studio format will be employed to develop a solid understanding of the characteristics of light. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    IM110 Digital Photography 1 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Begins the process of working with electronic digital cameras, digital work flow, and Photoshop software. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    IM130 Image Boot Camp 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Is a basic digital photography class that deals with camera and lens operations. The information includes the camera settings of both shutter speed and aperature, and how, when combined, produces a correctly exposed digital file. Lens discussions involve focal length, depth of field properties, and focusing techniques. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    IM200 Advanced Lighting 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Students will continue studies in lighting principles introduced in Basic Lighting. Topics include lighting ratios,characteristics, additive and subtractive methods, color balancing and mixed lighting. Prerequisite(s): ( IM100 Or IM100 ) (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    IM210 Digital Photography 2 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Futhers the processes and skills learned in Digital Photogaphy 1 by addressing the making of selections, masking, basic color correction, film scanning, advanced Photoshop, file managing, and archiving. Prerequisite(s): ( IM110 Or IM110 ) (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    IM220 Visual Thinking for Photographers 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    A class devoted to stretching the creative, conceptual muscles of photographers in the imagining, development, and production of a compelling image - an image that's more than just a pretty picture. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    IM310 Introduction to Portraiture 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    At some point in every photographer's career it is necessary to photograph people. This course provides the technical information needed to become proficient in a variety of fields where subjects are people. Broad, short, Rembrandt, split; beauty and butterfly lighting are some of the basics covered here. Posing and body language will also be discussed. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    IM320 Introduction to Product Illustration 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Photographing objects can be a fairly straightforward task. Styling, design, concerting, lighting and shooting to a layout are just some of the topics covered in this hands on course. Photographing objects of all sizes from small to large will be discussed or demonstrated in the course. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    IM340 Documentary Photography 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Capturing the essence of people, places and events is the main thrust of the material presented in this course. The photo doumentarian works with socially significant issues through the language of photography. Subject matter may be the environment, travel or the human condition. This course deals with photographs as a series of images as well as single images. Class topics include equipment, films, processes, researching and finding markets, obtaining releases and a variety of other related ideas and information. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    IM350 Equipment & Tools 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    New equipment will be presented on a weekly basis including, but not limited to, cameras, lenses, lights and light modifiers, digital capture and processing tools, and grip/location gear. Operational demonstrations and hands on usage will be stressed. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    IM410 Competitions for Photographers 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    By creating and exploring various photographic techniques, students will execute specific conceptual assignments while meeting required production timelines. Personal expressionism and unique photographic styles are encouraged. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    IM420 Fashion and Beauty 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Clothing, accessories, model portfolios and performers are a few of the subjects in the fashion and glamour field. This course covers finding and working with models, lighting and posing techniques, film/digital equipment, model releases and other information required to work successfully in this fast paced and competitive field. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    IM430 Interiors and Exteriors 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Styling, composition, and lighting are important factors in showcasing living and working spaces. Balancing mixed light, choosing appropriate props, and determining the ideal camera location can define the vision of an architect, interior designer or space planner. This type of photography can be used in editorial magazines or commercial brochures. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    IM510 Tabletop/Still Life Photography 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Students will continue studies in lighting principles. Topics include lighting ratios, characteristics, additive and subtractive methods, color balancing and mixed lighting. Prerequisite(s): ( IM200 Or IM200 ) (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    IM520 Corporate Photography 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Annual reports, quarterly reports and corporate public relations are but a few of the areas in which the corporate industrial photographer works. Learning the skills which make it possible to photograph not only the executive portrait, but the material stored in the warehouse, the new goods coming off the assembly line and the worker in the environment of industry are the lessons delivered in this informative course. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    IM620 Styling 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Styling improves the level of visual taste and sophistication through coordinating the various elements (people, clothing, food, objects, background, etc.) and designing them for photographic production. Introduction to prop houses and various sources necessary to produce styled photographs will be covered. Image research from publications illustrating current photographic styles is also emphasized. Group critiques will allow evaluation of how well student knowledge and skills have been demonstrated. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    IM640 Weddings 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Wedding photography is part portraiture and part photojournalism. This course covers the basics from scheduling the event to the final portfolio presentation. Sandwiched in between that start and finish will include posing, lighting basics, the use of filters, and the importance of storytelling. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    IM720 Individual Projects 1 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    The student must provide a pre-determined number of concepts and present these ideas to the department head for approval. Once approved, the student must meet and maintain a production schedule for the balance of the quarter. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    IM730 Business and Marketing 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Each student is assigned to a working commercial photography studio. The student and studio must commit to a full eight hour work day a week, for ten weeks. The student will perform as an assistant, take direction from the photographer, complete requested tasks, and learn through observation and participation the day to day operations of a photography business. At the end of the quarter the studio will be contacted for a performance review of the student and a final grade will follow. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    IM810 Graduate Portfolio Development 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Emphasis will be placed on polishing presentation, developing and expanding local network contacts, and refining the skill of self-assessment, self-promotion and marketing. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    IM820 Individual Projects 2 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Established for the focused student to further expand his/her final graduate portfolio. The student must provide a pre-determined number of concepts and present these ideas to the department head for approval. Once approved, the student must meet and maintain a production schedule for the balance of the quarter. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    IM830 Assisting Workshop 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Each student is assigned to a working commercial photography studio. The student and studio must commit to a full eight hour work day a week, for ten weeks. The student will perform as an assistant, take direc¬tion from the photographer, complete requested tasks, and learn through observation and participation the day to day operations of a photography business. At the end of the quarter the studio will be contacted for a performance review of the student and a final grade will follow. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    IM840 Directed Studies 1 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    This class is designed for the ever changing needs and opportuni¬ties for the Creative Circus student. This class will enable The Circus to address needs outside the normal curriculum and be adaptive to special situations for its students. These situations may include a special guest instructor from the creative industry, a special project, large or small in scope, submitted to The Circus for student participation, and/or working on certain aspects specific to the completion of the graduate book. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

     Teamwork (TM)

    TM210 Introduction to Creative Team 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Introduces the student to the basic work structure in which he or she will work through the remainder of both school and professional careers. Teamed with a partner, the student will be exposed to the techniques of joint brainstorming, concept development and execution of ideas through thumbnails or comps (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    TM310 Creative Team 3 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Working with a partner of another discipline, the student will concept several print advertising campaigns during the course of this class. The objective of the course is to begin to develop professional-level samples of the student's work for their final portfolio (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    TM311 Advertising Concepts 1 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Students will develop advertising concepts to be presented weekly in class. This course will stress not only the value of the concepts but also the manner in which they are presented, including voice, vocabulary, conviction, cogency and ease (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    TM410 Creative Team 4 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Working with a partner, students will be required to develop original advertising campaigns for common, workaday consumer products advancing skills learned in TM310 (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    TM411 Advertising Concepts 2 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Working with a partner, the student will carry forward the concepting of print advertising campaigns. The objective is to develop further professional]level samples of the studentfs work for his or her final portfolio (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    TM510 Creative Team 5 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Another round of concepting, creating and executing with a partner. Preferably a new partner with whom you have never worked with before and always with new products and approaches. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    TM511 Advertising Concepts 3 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    The student, working with her or his partner, will begin to create some of the final forms of campaigns which will form the core of the student's work for his or her final portfolio (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    TM601 Interdisciplinary Team 1 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    This course collaborates art directors or designers, writer and photographer in a creative team of two or more persons to create an original campaign or poster. The photography samples may be produced on location or in the studio. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    TM610 Creative Team 6: Alternative Marketing 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    While working with a partner, the student will be exposed to the radical, innovative, unconventional and sometimes startling approaches to advertising which have come to be called "guerrilla marketing" (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    TM611 Advertising Concepts 4 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Working in teams, the students will concept and execute a series of print campaigns (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    TM710 Creative Team 7 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Working within a team, the student will develop original advertising campaigns at the highest level of excellence for common consumer products and package goods. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    TM711 Advertising Concepts 5 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    In this final quarter of Advertising Concepts, the student will create advertising campaigns, across all media, which may be expected to represent the student's talent and abilities in the job market through their final portfolio Prerequisite(s): ( TM311 And TM411 And TM511 And TM611 ) (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    TM814 Concepting for the Portfolio 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    The student will be expected to review his or her own portfolio and to work with the instructor in this class to reinforce strengths and fill gaps in what will become the student's graduate portfolio All assignments in this class will be tailored to the student's individual need. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

     Visual Arts (VS)

    VS101 Typography 1 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Introduction to type as symbols, individual letter forms, shape and spac (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    VS102 Introduction to Graphic Design 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Develop a basic understanding of design principles and vocabulary for creative visual thinking (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    VS201 Typography 2 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Continues to look into applied typography and its design Prerequisite(s): ( VS101 ) (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    VS202 Color Theory 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Explores color as the soul of design and how these theories are applied to specific creative works (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    VS203 Production Methodologies 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    This hands-on course offers the student knowledge of how to prepare his or her work for printing and reproduction. The course covers various printing methods, inks, papers and press prep methods. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    VS301 Typography 3 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    Advanced course giving a detailed examination of letter forms and extensive development of multi]page and book design skills Prerequisite(s): ( VS101 And VS201 ) (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    VS302 Advanced Color Theory 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    The class is a continued exploration of the use of color. Art directors apply color theory to bring more dynamics to current concepts for portfolio pieces. Design students explore more two and three dimensional color uses in the development of portfolio pieces. Prerequisite(s): ( VS401 And CG900 And VS202 ) (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)

    VS401 Design Concepts 1.65 Quarter Credit Hours
    This class addresses the strategy/concept/design process by assigning a variety of creative problems. Strategy, concepting, new media, logos, 3-D, type, color and layout are addressed to create a clear, cohesive, communicative original end product. (11-22-0-8.25, 1.65)
     

    Organization, Faculty & Staff

     

    Organization

    The Creative Circus is an independent, co-educational, postsecondary institution and is owned and operated by STVT-AAI Education Inc., a Texas corporation with headquarters located in Hurst, Texas. The affairs of the school are managed by the governing board and the Executive Director. The address of the corporate office is 8701 Bedford Euless Road, Suite 400, Hurst, TX 76053, telephone number 682-334-5605, email address questions@ancoraeducation.com. The website of the principal corporate office is: www.ancoraeducation.com.


    GOVERNANCE

    Board of Directors of STVT-AAI Education Inc.

    William Hansen

    Pete Kirchof

    Michael Williams

    Andrew Milgram

    Daniel Ducote Jr.

    Stephanie Nellons-Paige

    Aron Schwartz

    Michael Zawisky

     

    Administrative Staff

    Janie Belden
    Director of Education
    David Haan
    Executive Director
    Jaye Liptak
    Admissions Representative
    Melaney Johnson
    Registrar
    Meredith Lindale
    Admissions Representative
    Alissa Funk
    Career Services Advisor
    Kim Bianco
    Marketing Manager
    Brooks Jones
    Facilities & Technology Manager
    Carolann Robinson
    Director of Admissions
    Hannah Heller
    Director of Career Services
    Nicole Rej
    Student Services Manager
    Myla Wilson
    Financial Services Sr. Officer
    Candice Smith
    Financial Services Officer
     

    Faculty

    Aaron Konter
    ABJ, The University of Georgia 
    Certificate, The Creative Circus 
    Adam Harrell
    BA, Appalachian State University
    Alex Burmenko
    BA, Georgia State University 
    Allison Yancy
    Certificate, The Creative Circus 
    Amanda Nolte
    Certificate, The Creative Circus 
    Andrew Hamilton
    BA, Emory University
    Certificate, The Creative Circus 
    Beryl Firestone
    BS, University of Florida
    Certificate, The Creative Circus 
    Blair Dempster
    BA, Penn State University 
    Certificate, The Creative Circus 
    Brandon George
    BA, Vanderbilt University 
    Caleb Morris
    BFA, Savanah College of Art & Design 
    Catherine Perry
    BA, University of Georgia
    Certificate, The Creative Circus 
    Charles Austin
    Certificate, The Creative Circus 
    Dakota Ling
    BFA, Western Carolina University
    Danny Corrales
    BA, Art Institute
    Certificate, The Creative Circus 
    David Gordon
    BA, University of Arizona
    Certificate, Miami Ad School 
    Derrick Ogilvie
    BA, University of Georgia
    Certificate, Portfolio Center 
    Don Hardy
    BFA, Delta State University 
    Ed James
    Resume 
    Ed Morgan
    BA, Emory University
    Eric Holden
    BFA, Art Institute of Atlanta 
    Gary Weiss
    BVA, Georgia State University
    BFA, Art Center College of Design 
    Grant Weber
    BA, Evergreen State College
    Certificate, The Creative Circus 
    Greg Haygood
    BS, University of Chicago 
    Hannah Williams
    BS, Erskine College
    Certificate, The Creative Circus 
    Jennifer Burrows
    BA, University of Miami
    Certificate, The Creative Circus 
    Jonathan Mueller
    BA, University of Florida
    Certificate, The Creative Circus 
    Jonathan Spring
    BFA, Savanah College of Art & Design 
    Kelly Lewis
    Certificate, The Creative Circus 
    Kevin Ames
    Kevin Rej
    BFA, University of Georgia 
    Lindsay Zarczynski
    BFA, Georgia State University
    Certificate, The Creative Circus 
    Lisa Balser
    BS, Kent State University
    Certificate, Portfolio Center 
    Melissa Thursby
    BS, Armstong Atlantic State University
    Certificate, The Creative Circus 
    Michael Marley
    Certificate, The Creative Circus 
    Mitch Bennett
    BA, University if North Carolina
    Certificate, The Creative Circus 
    Nakita Pope
    BA, Hampton University
    Certificate, Portfolio Center 
    Peter Harris
    BA, Milligan College
    Certificate, The Creative Circus 
    Priya Pilani
    BBA, The New School
    MBA, University of South Florida
    Rachael Green
    Certificate, The Creative Circus 
    Randy Spears
    BA, Mars Hill University 
    Rebecca Zavorski
    BA, The University of Georgia 
    Certificate, The Creative Circus 
    Richarsd Nenoff
    BA, Washington University
    Certificate, The Creative Circus 
    Robert Cherof
    BS, University of Florida
    Robert Lee
    BFA, Columbus College of Art and Design 
    Rochelle Augsbury
    BS, New York University 
    Rodney Johnson
    MFA, SCAD in progress 
    Sarah Bailey
    Certificate, The Creative Circus 
    Sarah Lowe 
    Bam Saginaw Valley State University
    Certificate, The Creative Circus 
    Stefan Kjartansson
    BA, Listahaskoli Island 
    Ted Murphy
    BFA, Atlanta College of Arts
    Theresa Bremer
    Certificate, The Creative Circus 
    Theresa Sicurezza
    Thomas Futch
    TomTurnquist
    BA, Georgia Southern University
    Certificate, Portfolio Center 
    William Benham 
    BS, Clemson University
    Certificate, The Creative Circus